Boeing hit by more cancelled orders even as MAX nears return

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A British Airways Boeing 747-400 (G-CIVY) aircraft arrives at St. Athan airport on October 8, 2020 in St. Athan, Wales.
A British Airways Boeing 747-400 (G-CIVY) aircraft arrives at St. Athan airport on October 8, 2020 in St. Athan, Wales.
  • Boeing has been hit with more cancelled orders for its 737 MAX jet as the plane readies to resume commercial flights this month.
  • The aircraft has been grounding for 20 months following two crashes that together claimed 346 lives.
  • US air regulators last month approved the MAX to return to service following upgrades to flight systems and pilot training.


Boeing was hit with more cancelled orders for its 737 MAX jet in November, according to sales data Tuesday, even as the plane readies to resume commercial flights this month.

Boeing reported 63 net cancellations for the MAX last month, adding to the growing tally following two deadly crashes that caused the aircraft to be grounded worldwide in March 2019.

US air regulators last month approved the MAX to return to service following upgrades to flight systems and pilot training, a move Brazil's civil air regulator followed a week later.

Brazilian domestic carrier GOL Linhas Aereas Inteligentes is scheduled to resume commercial service on the MAX beginning Wednesday, the airline said this week.

American Airlines also plans to resume commercial flights later this month.

The latest MAX cancellations bring Boeing's net order total to 536 since the start of the year.

The November figures include the restructuring of an order with Virgin Australia, which dropped a plan to receive 23 Boeing 737 MAX 8 planes, but will still receive 25 of the MAX 10 models under a later delivery schedule.

The aircraft has been grounding for 20 months following two crashes that together claimed 346 lives. New jet demand also has been dented by a major downturn in air travel amid the coronavirus.

However, Boeing's fortunes have begun to improve after the Federal Aviation Administration's decision last month to clear the MAX for service.

And Irish carrier Ryanair last week announced it would acquire 75 of the planes.

On Tuesday, Boeing delivered a MAX to United Airlines, the first delivery of the plane to a commercial carrier since the grounding. The US carrier plans to resume flights on the MAX in the first quarter of 2021.

The new sales data also showed Boeing delivered seven planes in November, taking its total to 118 for 2020 so far. Boeing delivered 345 jets during the year-ago period.

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