Carbon tax key in reducing emissions to respond to climate change - Treasury official

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Carbon pricing can help incentivise firms to lower emissions, according to Treasury.
Carbon pricing can help incentivise firms to lower emissions, according to Treasury.
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If steps are not taken urgently to lower global temperatures - mainly by reducing carbon emissions - Gauteng risks a day zero or water shortage brought on by climate change extremes, researchers have warned. 

Earlier in August, the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released its Working Group I report - Climate Change 2021: the Physical Science Basis. The report is the first in a series linked to the IPCC's Sixth Assessment Report, due for completion in 2022. The report highlights the risk of climate change such as unprecedented weather events set to hit all regions of the planet.

Particularly southern Africa is expected to become warmer and drier than it already is, making it hard to adapt to changes in climate, according to co-author of the report Francois Engelbrecht, professor of climatology global institute at the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits). Engelbrecht was speaking during a virtual colloquium hosted by the Presidential Climate Change Coordinating Commission, which focused on the IPCC report.

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