OPINION | Berry lekker: How urban foraging is one way to help feed SA's hungry

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Many of South Africa's poor suffer nutritional deficiencies. (Photo: Getty Images/Gallo Images)
Many of South Africa's poor suffer nutritional deficiencies. (Photo: Getty Images/Gallo Images)
Many of South Africa's poor suffer nutritional def

Exotic fruits that grow locally, uncultivated, can help curb nutritional deficiencies experienced by chronically poor South Africans, say Sifiso Skenjana and Simphiwe Mahlangu . 

Some of our fondest memories growing up are of the after-school trek to the thorny bushes of eMsobomvu in Butterworth, the Eastern Cape, in search of iziphingo - wild dark berries with a thick centre pip.

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