Sifiso Ntombela | Getting civil servants to farm could cut public wages and grow food supplies

accreditation
Share your Subscriber Article
You have 5 articles to share every month. Send this story to a friend!
0:00
play article
Subscribers can listen to this article
Sifiso Ntombela.
Sifiso Ntombela.
Supplied

Commercial farmers are, on average, 62 years old. Incentivising agriculture graduates and public servants to go into farming could have long-term benefits for food security and job creation, says Sifiso Ntombela.

The renowned Strategic Plan for the South African Agriculture, published in 2001 to the current draft Agriculture and Agro-processing Master Plan, identifies inadequate, ineffective and inefficient support systems as barriers to a competitive and sustainable agriculture and food business.

Surprisingly, state-led agricultural support and development programmes intentionally do not incentivise current government officials to transition to farming as a full-time career - subject to cooling-off period. But it is worth noting that today, some successful farmers are former government officials from an apartheid era that decided to cash out their pension during the transitional period (between 1993 and 1997) and venture into farming. Most of them own prime agricultural land in Gauteng, the Western Cape, KwaZulu-Natal and the North West. The human capital quotient of these former bureaucrats in terms of skills, knowledge and experience of agricultural production and policy is echoed by their contribution and impact in private commodity associations that mushroomed after apartheid.

Support independent journalism
Subscribe to News24 for just R75 per month to read all our investigative and in-depth journalism. You can cancel any time.
Subscribe
Already a subscriber? Sign in
Rand - Dollar
14.86
-0.9%
Rand - Pound
20.44
-0.9%
Rand - Euro
17.22
-0.9%
Rand - Aus dollar
11.14
-1.1%
Rand - Yen
0.13
-0.5%
Gold
1,793.70
-0.8%
Silver
24.16
-1.7%
Palladium
2,006.86
-2.6%
Platinum
1,032.00
-2.9%
Brent Crude
85.99
+0.5%
Top 40
61,025
+1.0%
All Share
67,615
+1.0%
Resource 10
63,620
+0.3%
Industrial 25
87,147
+1.5%
Financial 15
14,027
+0.9%
All JSE data delayed by at least 15 minutes Iress logo
Company Snapshot
Voting Booth
Facebook is facing a fresh crisis after a former employee turned whistle-blower leaked internal company research . Do you still use Facebook?
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
Yes, the benefits outweigh the risk for me
26% - 307 votes
No, I have deleted it
44% - 523 votes
Yes, but I am considering deleting it
30% - 358 votes
Vote