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23 Jan 2006

MALE MALTESE TERRIOR - CRAMPING IN HIS LEGS-5.5 YRS OLD
MY 5yr6mnth MALE MALTESE TERRIER (LONG HAIRED MALTESE) HAS SUDDENLY DEVELOPED CRAMPING IN HIS LEGS. IT STARTED OFF WITH HIS RHS BACK LEG, AND RECENTLY BOTH BACK LEGS AND FRONT LEG CRAMPS UP ONE AFTER THE OTHER. THIS HAPPENS WHEN HE HAS BEEN LYING STILL FOR A LONG TIME AND ALSO WHEN WE GO FOR A DRIVE IN THE CAR, HE STICKS HIS HEAD OUT OF THE WINDOW AND BALANCES HIS HIND LEGS ON MY LAP. WE THOUGHT IT COULD BE HIS KNEES BUT X-RAYS SHOW NO ARTHRITUS, KNEE CAPS ARE IN PLACE, SPINE LOOKS NORMAL. COULD HE BE GETTING MUSCLE CRAMPS FROM LACK OF SALT OR OTHER VITAMINS/MINERALS? HE GETS OUT OF BREATH QUITE QUICKLY WHEN WE GO FOR A WALK AND OFTEN PANTS WHEN GETTING HOT. HE HAS A THICK COAT OF STRAIGHT WHITE HAIR (LOOKS A LOT LIKE A SHITZU WITH THICK HAIR) HE EATS HUMAN FOOD, MADE UP BY A VET, CALLED VIP. MEAT/CHICKEN/LIVER, VEGES & RICE & ADDED VITAMINS. HE HAS 3 - 4 HILLS TDI BISCUITS EVERY SECOND DAY AS A TREAT. WE NEVER FEED HIM OFF THE TABLE AND HE NEVER GETS SCRAPS. AFTER HIS CRAMPING WHEN I STRETCH HIS LEGS HE RELAXES AND THE CRAMS ABATES AND HE IS 100% FINE IMMEDIATELY. HE CRAMPS UP FOR ABOUT 10 - 15 SECONDS. HIS LEGS CURL RIGHT UP. HE DOES NOT SCREAM, OR CRY, HE JUST MOANS. (HE IS A TALKER AND TALKS MOANS & GROANS ABOUT EVERYTHING FROM WANTING TO WALK TO EATING FOOD). HE JUMPS UP AND DOWN OFF MY BED, RUNS UP & DOWN THE STEPS. HE IS HOWEVER RATHER A SEDENTARY DOG AND SITS RATHER THAN STANDS. HE WEIGHS 3.8KG AND IS NOT OVERWEIGHT. , BEFORE I SEE A SPECIALIST/NEUROLOGIST, WHAT DO YOU THINK IT MIGHT BE? I DON'T THINK IT IS HIS KNEES? A PINCHED NERVE, A DIFFICIENCY IN SALT? I WOULD APPRECIATE YOUR COMMENTS PLEASE. MY CELL NO. IS 082 376 8802 AND MY E-MAIL ADDRESS IS AS ABOVE. THANKS FOR YOUR TIME. REGARDS MAUREEN
Answer 1,378 views
Expert
CyberVet
cybervet

01 Jan 0001

This is certainly an unusual condition. I have seen muscle cramping associated with certain electrolyte disturbances, and investigation of the bloody electrolytes as well as glucose levels and muscle enzyme should certainly be performed. Partial epileptic seizures can also look similar, and can be more difficult to diagnose unless witnessed by the veterinarian. Certainly, further investigation is necessary.

Dr Malan van Zyl
Veterinary Specialist Physician
Cape Town
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