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08 Aug 2007

RUNNING
I STARTED TRAINING 3 WEEKS AGO FROM 2KM AND KNOW 6KM
I'M NOT ABLE TO RUN 2 CONSECUTIVE DAYS AS I BECOME VERY TIRED THE FOLLOWING DAY. PLS ADVISE
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Expert
FitnessDoc
fitnessdoc

01 Jan 0001

Hi SMA

Your progress has been very rapid, considering that having begun from a relatively inactive start, you're now running 6km. And this is great, I'm not saying you shouldn't be, because it's really good. But a lot of people would not even dream of being able to run 30 minutes or more (I assume that your 6km takes between 30 and 40 minutes?) so soon after starting.

So possibly your fatigue is nothing more than the result of your suddenly starting to train quite a lot.And then what you would need to do is simply cut back down to 4km a day, for about a week or two, until you adapt, then go up to 5km, then 6km. The more gradual increase will make it easier to tolerate.

However, what is more likely is that when you started training, you suddenly increased your energy use per day. In otherwords, you are now burning about 400 calories a day more than you used to. The problem is that if you don't increase your energy intake, at least partially, then you can easily run into problems with your energy levels. In my experience, the biggest cause of this fatigue and lack of energy is WHOLE DAY energy intake. So a Powerade might help, but I don't think this is the whole answer, I think it requires more than this. What will help is to look at your diet during the course of the day. I suspect that what is happening is that you are exercising, using energy and then not replacing it with a full meal for the next day. The likely candidate here will either be supper/dinner on the night of the training day, or a breakfast the next day, which is not large enough to give you energy you need. The key with diet is to eat smallish meals, but often throughout the day. So I would look at your diet, and in particular, how many carbohydrates you are taking in.

Remember, that you body needs carbs for energy - a lack of energy is often (not always, but most times) caused by a lack of carbs in the diet. So increasing this could be the answer. Multivitamins are possibly worth considering, but I doubt this is the solution, because in our current diets, we are very very rarely malnourished enough to be deficient. So it might help, but more likely than not, it'll just be wasted money and you'll have expensive urine! My suggestion for first port of call is carbs, and it's simply a case of eating slightly larger meals with more carbohydrates, and I suspect it will help.

Good luck
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