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Question

27 Jul 2010

Paternity
I have been asking the girl that claims that I am the dad to her daughter for a paternity test, but she refuses to do so. She says that its causing friction in her current relationship
And does not want to do the test, but maintains I am the father.

The child is now 6 years old and I can understand where she is coming from, but I would like to know even though it is very late in the child’ s life.
how do I go about getting a court order for her to do the test &  also what will the costs be &  what information would I need to obtain. Thank you
Answer 7,441 views
Expert
Family law expert
family law expert

01 Jan 0001

The new Children's Act places in Section 36 a presumption in respect of a child born out of wedlock. The presumption is that the person whom had sexual intercourse with the mother at any time when that child could have been conceived will be presumed to be the biological father of the child in the absence of evidence to the contrary which raises reasonable doubt. In S v L 1992 (3) SA 713 (E) it was held that the phrase "in the absence of evidence to the contrary which raises reasonable doubt" means that whenever there is evidence to the contrary, the presumption does not operate or ceases to operate.

This is also in line with the court's decision in the case of R v Epstein 1951 (1) SA 278 (O), where it was held that a presumption operating "in the absence of evidence to the contrary" only requires evidence, not proof, to counteract the presumption. The Children's Act does not define the word "evidence", thus any acceptable evidence suffices, regardless of whether it is direct or circumstantial, however, it must raise reasonable doubt.

Section 37 of the Children's Act states that if a person in proceedings in which paternity of a child is challenged refuses to submit him/herself, or the child, to take blood samples in order to carry out a scientific test to prove the paternity of the child, then a presumption in our law exists in which the failure of such a party to agree to such a test may be used as evidence to prove the contrary. The effect of this section is that it compels a court to warn the person who has refused to have his/her or the child's blood sample taken 'of the effect' which such refusal might have on his/her credibility.

Refusal by mother to submit her and child to paternity testing

In O v O, Friedman JP stated that there is no statutory or common-law power enabling the court to order an adult to allow a blood sample to be taken for the purpose of establishing paternity. Although there is still no such power, Section 37 obliges the court to warn the mother of the consequences of her refusal (perhaps that the man she is accusing of having fathered her child cannot be deemed to have fathered the child in the absence of a blood test). He would then in all probability not be ordered to pay maintenance for the child.



By Bertus Preller

Family Law Attorney

KWJ Inc. Cape Town

www.divorcettorney.co.za

info@divorceattorney.co.za
The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical examination, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.
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