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16 Nov 2004

Sweat and treadmill
I started gim in April, lost 16 kg and feeling great. Doing treadmill most of the time - 3 to 6 km per day (jog and walk) - 5 days per week. Still need to lose about 10 kg's. Problem - i sweat extreamly. After my workout, it looks like if been in a shower. Why??
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Expert
FitnessDoc
fitnessdoc

01 Jan 0001

HI Liz

It's great to hear that you have achieved these results, it's good that someone can back up that exercise is the way forward.

As for the sweating, there are a couple of things. Remember that everyone sweats, and you have to sweat, because this is the only way you can lose heat. If you didn't sweat you would burn up. The problem is the humidity. Sweat can either evaporate off the skin (which is good, because this is the process by which the heat is lost - as sweat evaporates, it takes heat with it), or it can drip off. When the humidity is very high, which is probably the case, especially because you are indoors, the sweat cannot evaporate - it has no where to go and it drips off. So, you might actually be sweating exactly the same amount now as you used to, but maybe it's more humid now and so it drips off rather than evaporating. That's one possibility. The other is that it is a lot warmer now than a few months back and so you have to sweat more to lose heat because you gain more heat when exercising.

Finally, as someone pointed out, with training comes an increase in the capacity to sweat - you are better able to 'recruit' sweat glands. The body has a set number, but with training, you are able to activate more of these glands, and so yes, fitter people tend to sweat more than when they were unfit. So, keep up your good work, the sweating is part of the deal, you can't change it much, so you just have to become accustomed to it (which happens anyway, because remember you will be more efficient and generate less heat and so over time, you will actually produce less heat and therefore sweat less)

Good luck
The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical examination, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.
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