How alcohol affects young brains

Based on the results of a new study conducted with rats, researchers say that kids who drink alcohol may have trouble with decision-making in adulthood.

Alcohol consumption during adolescence can change the perception of risk but does not affect how rewards are valued, the University of Washington researchers found.

The investigators studied decision-making in adult rats that had been given free access to alcohol when they were adolescents. The researchers measured changes in the neurotransmitter dopamine when the rats were offered rewards alone and also in response to cues predicting risky or certain outcomes.

Alcohol and risky options

"Dopamine is central to the way we process and evaluate rewards and is the primary target in the brain for virtually all abused drugs," study author Jeremy J. Clark, an acting assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioural sciences, explained in a university news release.

In the rats, alcohol use during adolescence increased dopamine signalling to risky options but did not affect responses to rewards.

"Alcohol is corrupting the ability to make a good decision by altering the perception of risk. It doesn't appear to be about the reward," Clark said.

The study was published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study authors noted that the findings might lead to improved treatments for those with a history of substance abuse.


(Copyright © 2010 HealthDay. All rights reserved.)

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