Exercise and physical therapy improve arthritis symptoms

Regular exercise and physical therapy may benefit people with hip and knee arthritis, new research suggests.

The study included 206 people with hip and knee osteoarthritis, average age 66, who were divided into two groups. One group received usual care, while the other group had regular exercise, physical therapy or both added to their standard care.

After two years, those who did exercise and/or physical therapy had greater improvements in pain, stiffness and physical function than those who received usual medical care alone, the investigators found.

The study findings are scheduled for presentation Saturday at the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting in Boston. Research presented at meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

The results show that adding exercise and/or physical therapy to usual medical care benefits people with knee and hip arthritis, concluded lead author J. Haxby Abbott, of the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand.

Osteoarthritis - the most common type of joint disease among middle-aged and elderly people - causes progressive damage to cartilage in the joints. It can cause pain, swelling and reduced joint movement.

Read more:

Arthritis pain and lost sleep may lead to disability

Rheumatoid arthritis ups premature birth risks



We live in a world where facts and fiction get blurred
In times of uncertainty you need journalism you can trust. For only R75 per month, you have access to a world of in-depth analyses, investigative journalism, top opinions and a range of features. Journalism strengthens democracy. Invest in the future today.
Subscribe to News24
Voting Booth
Have you entered our Health of the Nation survey?
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
Yes
33% - 9321 votes
No
67% - 18653 votes
Vote