Hospitalised Covid-19 patients with secondary bloodstream infections more likely to have worse outcomes

accreditation
Share your Subscriber Article
You have 5 articles to share every month. Send this story to a friend!
This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.
loading...
Loading, please wait...
0:00
play article
Subscribers can listen to this article
Could a new drug give new hope to older people battling leukaemia?
Could a new drug give new hope to older people battling leukaemia?
Arek Socha, Pixabay

Hospitalised adult patients with severe Covid-19 and secondary bloodstream infections were mostly likely to have worse clinical outcomes, such as prolonged hospital stays, and had a higher hospital mortality, according to a new study. 

The research published in Clinical Infectious Diseases assessed 375 Covid-19 patients who were admitted to hospital. Of these patients, 128 of them also had secondary bloodstream infections.

Experts drew blood samples from patients who were admitted to three different healthcare facilities in New Jersey in the United States. They then separated the Covid-19 patients between those whose blood tests revealed that they had secondary bloodstream infection and those who did not.

Read this for free
Get 14 days free to read all our investigative and in-depth journalism. Thereafter you will be billed R75 per month. You can cancel anytime and if you cancel within 14 days you won't be billed.
Subscribe
Already a subscriber? Sign in
Voting Booth
Have you entered our Health of the Nation survey?
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
Yes
27% - 9950 votes
No
73% - 26291 votes
Vote