More suicides at higher altitudes

Twenty years of mortality data from counties across the United States led to the striking discovery that living at higher altitudes may be a risk factor for suicide, according to a provocative study published in High Altitude Medicine & Biology.

Researchers examined cause-of-death data from all 2,584 US counties between 1979 and 1998 and found that, as a group, people living at higher elevations had a statistically significant higher rate of suicide. They report an apparent link between altitude of residence and suicide rate.

Other risk factors

The positive correlation between elevation and suicide risk was present even when the authors controlled for known suicide risk factors, such as older age, male sex, white race, and low income. Interestingly, the authors determined that the increased suicide rates at higher altitudes are not part of a broader association between mortality from all causes and living at higher elevations. In fact, they report a significantly lower overall mortality rate at higher altitudes.

"This article describes a new, unexpected finding of a link between suicide rate and altitude of residence. The cause is obscure as yet," says John B. West, Editor-in-Chief of High Altitude Medicine & Biology and Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. - (EurekAlert!, January 2011)

Read more:
Attempted suicide: a risk life long
Danger signals of suicide
When someone you know is suicidal

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