Masks make talking even tougher for people who stutter

accreditation
  • Face masks may be invaluable in the fight against Covid-19, but they can make it difficult for people who stutter to communicate with others.
  • Stutterers have a difficult time if other people cannot see their mouths
  • This makes solid masks – required in public during the coronavirus pandemic – a problem
  • To solve the problem, stutterers can e.g. indicate that they stutter, or wear a clear mask


About three million people in the United States stutter, according to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). The use of face masks in public is likely to continue for months or even longer.

Solid face masks can lead to misunderstandings because they hide your mouth. Many people who stutter experience long, silent pauses (blocks) in their speech. Often, the only way a listener realises that someone is having a block is by looking at their face.

Reducing the risk of problems

If you stutter, the person you're talking to may not realise you're experiencing a block if you're wearing a mask. This could lead that person to talk over you, move on, or misinterpret what may seem like a non-response, according to the association.

This type of situation can be especially serious if you are trying to communicate with healthcare providers, first responders or police.

To reduce the risk of problems, the ASHA offers the following advice:

  • Tell people you stutter. You can say this at the beginning of a conversation or carry a printed card. That way, people know to give you extra time if you need it. It also can help remove some pressure if you're anticipating speech difficulties.
  • Wear a clear mask. Practice conversations at home. Check online support groups for suggestions. If you're working with a speech-language pathologist, ask for suggestions about modifying your speech therapy techniques.
  • If the roles are reversed and you're talking to someone with a stutter who's masked up, be patient. Don't try to finish their thought or speak for them, the speech and hearing experts say.
  • If you don't understand what the other person is saying, say so. Be open to other ways of communicating, such as reading a written message.

Image credit: iStock

We live in a world where facts and fiction get blurred
In times of uncertainty you need journalism you can trust. For 14 free days, you can have access to a world of in-depth analyses, investigative journalism, top opinions and a range of features. Journalism strengthens democracy. Invest in the future today. Thereafter you will be billed R75 per month. You can cancel anytime and if you cancel within 14 days you won't be billed. 
Subscribe to News24
Voting Booth
What are your thoughts on the possibility of having permanent Stage 2 or 3 load shedding?
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
I'll take that over constant schedule changes
13% - 1108 votes
Why are we normalising Eskom’s mess?
72% - 6171 votes
I've already found alternative ways of powering my home/business
15% - 1287 votes
Vote
Rand - Dollar
17.33
+0.4%
Rand - Pound
21.37
+0.3%
Rand - Euro
18.89
+0.1%
Rand - Aus dollar
12.27
+0.1%
Rand - Yen
0.13
+0.2%
Platinum
1,005.68
-0.7%
Palladium
1,663.22
+0.9%
Gold
1,929.12
+0.1%
Silver
23.52
-0.9%
Brent Crude
85.46
+1.1%
Top 40
73,898
+0.6%
All Share
79,963
+0.6%
Resource 10
75,486
-0.5%
Industrial 25
102,753
+0.5%
Financial 15
16,529
+2.4%
All JSE data delayed by at least 15 minutes Iress logo
Editorial feedback and complaints

Contact the public editor with feedback for our journalists, complaints, queries or suggestions about articles on News24.

LEARN MORE