Good news! Coffee and wine may promote a healthy gut

accreditation

The food you eat and the medicines you take can alter your gut bacteria in ways that either help or harm your digestive health, two new studies suggest.

Diversity is beneficial

Foods like fruits, vegetables, coffee, tea, wine, yogurt and buttermilk can increase the diversity of bacteria in a person's intestines. And that diversity can help ward off illness, said Dr Jingyuan Fu, senior author of one of the studies.

"It is believed that higher diversity and richness [in gut bacteria] is beneficial," explained Fu. She is an associate professor of genetics at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands.

Read: Gut bacteria suffer when hit with infection

On the other hand, foods containing loads of simple carbohydrates appear to reduce bacterial diversity in the gut, Fu and colleagues found. These include high-fat whole milk and sugar-sweetened soda.

In addition, medications can also play a part in the makeup of your gut bacteria. Antibiotics, the diabetes drug metformin and antacids can cut down on gut bacterial diversity, the researchers found. Smoking and heart attacks also can have a negative effect, the team said.

Each person's intestines contain trillions of microorganisms, which doctors refer to as the "gut microbiome", said Dr David Johnson. He is chief of gastroenterology at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, Virginia, and a past president of the American College of Gastroenterology.

A dramatic and prominent role

The gut microbiome plays an essential but little-understood role in human health, said Johnson, who was not involved with the new studies.

Read: Gut bacteria may be key to gastric bypass' effects: study

"It's the largest immune system in the body," Johnson explained. "These bacteria have a very dramatic and prominent role in determining health and disease."

To study the effect of lifestyle on the gut microbiome, Fu and her colleagues collected stool samples from more than 1,100 people living in the northern Netherlands.

The samples were used to analyse the DNA of the bacteria and other organisms that live in the gut. In addition to stools, the study collected information on the participants' diets, medicine use and health.

In the second study, researchers with the Flemish Gut Flora Project performed a similar analysis on stool samples taken from 5,000 volunteers in Belgium.

Both studies concluded that diet has a profound effect on the diversity of gut bacteria, although, Fu said, the "underlying theories of these dietary factors remain largely unknown".

Read: Gas and diet

Johnson added that medicines can have the same effect, and antibiotics actually can kill off some important strains of gut bacteria. "One dose of an antibiotic may disrupt your gut bacteria for a year," he said.

Both sets of researchers emphasised that their studies only help explain a fraction of gut bacteria variation – roughly 18 percent for the Netherlands study, and about 7 percent for the Flemish study.

High fibre and low carbs

However, the findings from the two groups overlapped about 80 percent of the time, indicating that they are on the right track, the researchers said.

The Belgian researchers estimated that over 40,000 human samples will be needed to capture a complete picture of gut bacteria diversity.

Read: Gut bacteria affect health and obesity

Johnson noted that other research has shown that poor sleep, obesity, diabetes and the use of artificial sweeteners also can interfere with gut bacteria.

"The general rule is a balanced diet with high fibre and low carbs tends to drive a better gut health overall," he said.

According to Fu, once researchers have a clearer understanding of the gut microbiome and its effects on health, doctors could be able to help prevent or heal illness by reading or influencing the bacteria within people's bodies.

"The personalized microbiome may assist in personalised nutrition, personalised medicine, disease risk stratification and treatment decision-making," she said.

Both studies were published in the journal Science.

Read more:

Symptoms of digestive disorders

Diagnosing digestive disorders

Preventing digestive disorders

We live in a world where facts and fiction get blurred
In times of uncertainty you need journalism you can trust. For 14 free days, you can have access to a world of in-depth analyses, investigative journalism, top opinions and a range of features. Journalism strengthens democracy. Invest in the future today. Thereafter you will be billed R75 per month. You can cancel anytime and if you cancel within 14 days you won't be billed. 
Subscribe to News24
Voting Booth
Have you entered our Health of the Nation survey?
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
Yes
27% - 9954 votes
No
73% - 26314 votes
Vote