When we inhale Covid-19 virus aerosols, more than 65% can reach the deepest parts of our lungs

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Covid-19 has been seen to cause lung damage in some patients, even post-infection.
Covid-19 has been seen to cause lung damage in some patients, even post-infection.
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It's already known how Covid-19 virus aerosols travel through the upper airways including the nose, mouth, and throat. Now, scientists have also found out how they move through the lower lungs when inhaled.

Consistent evidence has emerged over the past several months that the SARS-CoV-2 can be spread via aerosols, tiny, lightweight viral particles that can float and linger in the air for hours.

"Our lungs resemble tree branches that divide up to 23 times into smaller and smaller branches. Due to the complexity of this geometry, it is difficult to develop a computer simulation. However, we were able to model what happens in the first 17 generations, or branches, of the airways," the lead author of the study, Dr Saidul Islam, from the University of Technology Sydney, said in a news release

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