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Higher protein intake may be key to healthier eating

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Food nutrition. Proteins fats carbohydrates fiber health products for natural diet nutrition group garish vector cartoon illustrations. Protein and fat, nutrition carbohydrate calories
Food nutrition. Proteins fats carbohydrates fiber health products for natural diet nutrition group garish vector cartoon illustrations. Protein and fat, nutrition carbohydrate calories

High-protein diets have been popular for a while, with diet books on the topic dating back many decades. These diets are commonly adopted for weight loss, but researchers now suggest they may also lead to healthier eating habits.

The study, in the journal Obesity, involved just more than 200 adults, aged 24 to 75, who were either overweight or obese – both before and after six months on restricted calorie diets.

The participants then underwent a weight loss intervention programme that lasted six to 12 months, working with a registered nutritionist for counselling and support.

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