OPINION | Covid-19: A global time-out and why we need to pause for thought

accreditation
An employee of a South African company specialised in sanitisation wears a full protective suit while at the Wanderers taxi rank in Johannesburg. (Michele Spatari, AFP)
An employee of a South African company specialised in sanitisation wears a full protective suit while at the Wanderers taxi rank in Johannesburg. (Michele Spatari, AFP)

The threat of this virus is now clear for all to see, and each country is focused on establishing protocols needed to keep their citizens as safe as is possible, writes Howard Feldman


Remember when we were young, and we would complain for no real or fathomable reason?

It was before the days of parenting books, and before being told that we are not allowed to smack our children.

It was likely then, back in the day, that one of our parents would, in a fit of frustration and despair, raise a threatening hand and say, "I’ll give you something to cry about!"  

This is the story of Covid-19 in 2020.  

We really were getting a bit ahead of ourselves.

We sobbed about "cultural appropriation", we obsessed about pronouns, we re-wrote history and we judged prior generations for not being nearly as woke as we were.

We turned "outrage" into temples and plastic straws into devils.

We substituted emojis for emotions and confused social media with communication. 

We judged ourselves by our followers and let our feelings become ruled by the number of likes received.

The images that we shared were not of ourselves but a slimmer, younger, cooler version of our imagination and of our desires.

We reduced debate to the characters allowed by Twitter, which made us sharper, more cutting and far less kind.  

We confused "hook-ups" with relationships and hardly managed to slow down for long enough to get to know each other.  

And then the universe gave us something to cry about.  

Covid-19 has become the one conversation that we all choose to have.

The threat of this virus is now clear for all to see, and each country is focused on establishing protocols needed to keep their citizens as safe as is possible.

The lessons from China, Italy and Iran are being learned and with each hour of each day, the focus becomes sharper and more desperate.

All of a sudden, no one cares if the bathroom is gender neutral, just so long as it's clean.

No one would be so brash as to post a photo of their island excursion and no one is bothered by the use of disposables - so long as it is safe. 

Perspective, it seems, is everything.  

March 2020 and very few are worrying about war.

ISIS has asked it’s "fighters" to keep their hands hygienic and to avoid traveling to high risk areas.

In South Africa, all political parties are standing behind the President.

And the ANC, supporting the man the in charge, no matter which faction.  

These have to be some of the global lessons.

When we are presented with a formidable enemy greater than each other, then we have to work together to defeat it.  

But these lessons can't just be for global leaders.

As South Africa and the world retreats back into our homes, in what is a global time-out, we need to use that time to "think about what we have done". 

And whereas of course there is little to be achieved by "throwing the baby out with the bathwater" there are undoubtedly lessons to be learned from all of this.

Perhaps an examination of priorities and a contemplation into a list of values might be worth thinking about.

We will after all, have all the time that we need to do this.

Covid-19 is about to hit us hard.

We are all afraid.

Let's at least be afraid together.  

- Howard Feldman is a keynote speaker and analyst. He is the author of three books and is the morning talk show host on ChaiFM.

Disclaimer: News24 encourages freedom of speech and the expression of diverse views. The views of columnists published on News24 are therefore their own and do not necessarily represent the views of News24

We live in a world where facts and fiction get blurred
In times of uncertainty you need journalism you can trust. For 14 free days, you can have access to a world of in-depth analyses, investigative journalism, top opinions and a range of features. Journalism strengthens democracy. Invest in the future today. Thereafter you will be billed R75 per month. You can cancel anytime and if you cancel within 14 days you won't be billed. 
Subscribe to News24
Voting Booth
Zama zama crackdown: What are your thoughts on West Village residents taking the law into their own hands?
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
Authorities should bring in the army already
11% - 2321 votes
Illegal miners can't be scapegoated for all crime
48% - 9937 votes
What else did we expect without no proper policing
37% - 7691 votes
Vigilante groups are also part of the problem
4% - 766 votes
Vote
Rand - Dollar
16.68
-0.1%
Rand - Pound
20.07
+0.0%
Rand - Euro
16.96
-0.0%
Rand - Aus dollar
11.55
+0.1%
Rand - Yen
0.12
-0.2%
Gold
1,762.97
+0.1%
Silver
19.65
-0.8%
Palladium
2,140.20
-0.2%
Platinum
924.19
-0.5%
Brent Crude
93.65
+1.4%
Top 40
64,167
0.0%
All Share
70,967
0.0%
Resource 10
63,227
0.0%
Industrial 25
87,430
0.0%
Financial 15
16,160
0.0%
All JSE data delayed by at least 15 minutes Iress logo
Editorial feedback and complaints

Contact the public editor with feedback for our journalists, complaints, queries or suggestions about articles on News24.

LEARN MORE