People's Post

Keeping the lights on

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The Western Cape will look at alternative energy to stem load shedding in the province.PHOTO: Samantha Lee-Jacobs
The Western Cape will look at alternative energy to stem load shedding in the province.PHOTO: Samantha Lee-Jacobs

With the dreaded return of load shedding following a decently long break, residents of the Western Cape could breathe a sigh of relief should plans to become energy independent go ahead.

In his State of the Province (Sopa) address in February, premier Alan Winde stated the province’s commitment to creating its own renewable energy. This followed president Cyril Ramaphosa’s announcement that municipalities, who are capable of doing so, are at liberty to generate their own energy.

“At the top of our list is finding alternatives to the number one hand brake on economic growth, and also a huge frustration for all of us – Eskom,” said Winde at the time.

“Load shedding makes me the most angry when I hear of its effect on our small businesses. When stage six hit us on Monday 9 December it was a harsh awakening, and we have to be brave enough to admit to ourselves that we aren’t in for a quick fix.”

Winde continues that the province has been calling on national government for several years to make a number of energy reforms.

In his State of the Nation Address (Sona) on Thursday 13 February, Ramaphosa said Eskom’s capacity would be increased through renewable energy, natural gas, hydro-power, battery storage and coal.

This undertaking could take between three and 12 months, said Ramaphosa. He further warned residents that the likelihood of load shedding would continue as Eskom continues to battle constraints.

“It has severely set back our efforts to rebuild the economy and to create jobs. Every time it occurs, it disrupts people’s lives, causing frustration, inconvenience, hardship,” said Ramaphosa. “At its core, load shedding is the inevitable consequence of Eskom’s inability over many years – due to debt, lack of capacity and state capture – to service its power plants.”

While the steps are welcomed by the provincial government, Winde said he had several concerns surrounding the generation of power.

“The Western Cape has worked hard in recent years to develop the framework to support alternative energy: 23 of our municipalities support Small Scale Embedded Energy, we have promoted the uptake of solar PV, and we have done a large part of the groundwork required for the importation of Liquefied Natural Gas. As a province, we are primed to take advantage of the excellent economic opportunities that green- and alternative energy present for investment and growth,” said Winde.

“We are fortunate, especially in the Western Cape, to have some of the best solar and wind resources in the world, and we have the ability to become the emerging market leader in renewable energy.”

The province has a four-point plan to making this a reality.

. Municipalities will be assisted in procuring energy from Independent Power Producers.

“Procurement in the government space is complicated and time consuming, so we will ensure that there is dedicated support to speed up a more robust procurement process,” says Winde.

. Small Scale Embedded Generation like Solar power across the province will be increased.

. The greening of government buildings across the Western Cape will be increased.

“Where there is a government rooftop that can benefit from solar, it will be installed. We already have solar systems on 17 provincial buildings,” says Winde.

Municipalities across the province are being supported and encouraged to make similar investments.

. Importing of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) through Saldanha Bay will be fast tracked which enables Eskom’s Ankerlig plant to operate on LNG rather than the much more expensive diesel.

“Our work has already de-risked these initiatives, and we call on the national government to move with speed to bring LNG to our industries and power plants in the Province. Gas to power may also make sense in Mossel Bay,” says Winde.

“A petrol company is also already exploring offshore gas there, and while the outcome is several years away, we are starting the work now to make sure that we are able to maximise the major economic advantages which gas provides.”

While wind and solar resources are plentiful in the country, says Winde, adding that there is a potential for six times more generation. Local departments are already looking at ways to implement this in the province.

With the dreaded return of load shedding following a decently long break, residents of the Western Cape could breathe a sigh of relief should plans to become energy independent go ahead.

In his State of the Province (Sopa) address in February, premier Alan Winde stated the province’s commitment to creating its own renewable energy. This followed president Cyril Ramaphosa’s announcement that municipalities, who are capable of doing so, are at liberty to generate their own energy.

“At the top of our list is finding alternatives to the number one hand brake on economic growth, and also a huge frustration for all of us – Eskom,” said Winde at the time.

“Load shedding makes me the most angry when I hear of its effect on our small businesses. When stage six hit us on Monday 9 December it was a harsh awakening, and we have to be brave enough to admit to ourselves that we aren’t in for a quick fix.”

Winde continues that the province has been calling on national government for several years to make a number of energy reforms.

In his State of the Nation Address (Sona) on Thursday 13 February, Ramaphosa said Eskom’s capacity would be increased through renewable energy, natural gas, hydro-power, battery storage and coal.

This undertaking could take between three and 12 months, said Ramaphosa. He further warned residents that the likelihood of load shedding would continue as Eskom continues to battle constraints.

“It has severely set back our efforts to rebuild the economy and to create jobs. Every time it occurs, it disrupts people’s lives, causing frustration, inconvenience, hardship,” said Ramaphosa. “At its core, load shedding is the inevitable consequence of Eskom’s inability over many years – due to debt, lack of capacity and state capture – to service its power plants.”

While the steps are welcomed by the provincial government, Winde said he had several concerns surrounding the generation of power.

“The Western Cape has worked hard in recent years to develop the framework to support alternative energy: 23 of our municipalities support Small Scale Embedded Energy, we have promoted the uptake of solar PV, and we have done a large part of the groundwork required for the importation of Liquefied Natural Gas. As a province, we are primed to take advantage of the excellent economic opportunities that green- and alternative energy present for investment and growth,” said Winde.

“We are fortunate, especially in the Western Cape, to have some of the best solar and wind resources in the world, and we have the ability to become the emerging market leader in renewable energy.”

The province has a four-point plan to making this a reality.

. Municipalities will be assisted in procuring energy from Independent Power Producers.

“Procurement in the government space is complicated and time consuming, so we will ensure that there is dedicated support to speed up a more robust procurement process,” says Winde.

. Small Scale Embedded Generation like Solar power across the province will be increased.

. The greening of government buildings across the Western Cape will be increased.

“Where there is a government rooftop that can benefit from solar, it will be installed. We already have solar systems on 17 provincial buildings,” says Winde.

Municipalities across the province are being supported and encouraged to make similar investments.

. Importing of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) through Saldanha Bay will be fast tracked which enables Eskom’s Ankerlig plant to operate on LNG rather than the much more expensive diesel.

“Our work has already de-risked these initiatives, and we call on the national government to move with speed to bring LNG to our industries and power plants in the Province. Gas to power may also make sense in Mossel Bay,” says Winde.

“A petrol company is also already exploring offshore gas there, and while the outcome is several years away, we are starting the work now to make sure that we are able to maximise the major economic advantages which gas provides.”

While wind and solar resources are plentiful in the country, says Winde, adding that there is a potential for six times more generation.

Local departments are already looking at ways to implement this in the province.

With the dreaded return of load shedding following a decently long break, residents of the Western Cape could breathe a sigh of relief should plans to become energy independent go ahead.

In his State of the Province (Sopa) address in February, premier Alan Winde stated the province’s commitment to creating its own renewable energy. This followed president Cyril Ramaphosa’s announcement that municipalities, who are capable of doing so, are at liberty to generate their own energy.

“At the top of our list is finding alternatives to the number one hand brake on economic growth, and also a huge frustration for all of us – Eskom,” said Winde at the time.

“Load shedding makes me the most angry when I hear of its effect on our small businesses. When stage six hit us on Monday 9 December it was a harsh awakening, and we have to be brave enough to admit to ourselves that we aren’t in for a quick fix.”

Winde continues that the province has been calling on national government for several years to make a number of energy reforms.

In his State of the Nation Address (Sona) on Thursday 13 February, Ramaphosa said Eskom’s capacity would be increased through renewable energy, natural gas, hydro-power, battery storage and coal.

This undertaking could take between three and 12 months, said Ramaphosa. He further warned residents that the likelihood of load shedding would continue as Eskom continues to battle constraints.

“It has severely set back our efforts to rebuild the economy and to create jobs. Every time it occurs, it disrupts people’s lives, causing frustration, inconvenience, hardship,” said Ramaphosa. “At its core, load shedding is the inevitable consequence of Eskom’s inability over many years – due to debt, lack of capacity and state capture – to service its power plants.”

While the steps are welcomed by the provincial government, Winde said he had several concerns surrounding the generation of power.

“The Western Cape has worked hard in recent years to develop the framework to support alternative energy: 23 of our municipalities support Small Scale Embedded Energy, we have promoted the uptake of solar PV, and we have done a large part of the groundwork required for the importation of Liquefied Natural Gas. As a province, we are primed to take advantage of the excellent economic opportunities that green- and alternative energy present for investment and growth,” said Winde.

“We are fortunate, especially in the Western Cape, to have some of the best solar and wind resources in the world, and we have the ability to become the emerging market leader in renewable energy.”

The province has a four-point plan to making this a reality.

. Municipalities will be assisted in procuring energy from Independent Power Producers.

“Procurement in the government space is complicated and time consuming, so we will ensure that there is dedicated support to speed up a more robust procurement process,” says Winde.

. Small Scale Embedded Generation like Solar power across the province will be increased.

. The greening of government buildings across the Western Cape will be increased.

“Where there is a government rooftop that can benefit from solar, it will be installed. We already have solar systems on 17 provincial buildings,” says Winde.

Municipalities across the province are being supported and encouraged to make similar investments.

. Importing of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) through Saldanha Bay will be fast tracked which enables Eskom’s Ankerlig plant to operate on LNG rather than the much more expensive diesel.

“Our work has already de-risked these initiatives, and we call on the national government to move with speed to bring LNG to our industries and power plants in the Province. Gas to power may also make sense in Mossel Bay,” says Winde.

“A petrol company is also already exploring offshore gas there, and while the outcome is several years away, we are starting the work now to make sure that we are able to maximise the major economic advantages which gas provides.”

While wind and solar resources are plentiful in the country, says Winde, adding that there is a potential for six times more generation.

Local departments are already looking at ways to implement this in the province.

With the dreaded return of load shedding following a decently long break, residents of the Western Cape could breathe a sigh of relief should plans to become energy independent go ahead.

In his State of the Province (Sopa) address in February, premier Alan Winde stated the province’s commitment to creating its own renewable energy. This followed president Cyril Ramaphosa’s announcement that municipalities, who are capable of doing so, are at liberty to generate their own energy.

“At the top of our list is finding alternatives to the number one hand brake on economic growth, and also a huge frustration for all of us – Eskom,” said Winde at the time.

“Load shedding makes me the most angry when I hear of its effect on our small businesses. When stage six hit us on Monday 9 December it was a harsh awakening, and we have to be brave enough to admit to ourselves that we aren’t in for a quick fix.”

Winde continues that the province has been calling on national government for several years to make a number of energy reforms.

In his State of the Nation Address (Sona) on Thursday 13 February, Ramaphosa said Eskom’s capacity would be increased through renewable energy, natural gas, hydro-power, battery storage and coal.

This undertaking could take between three and 12 months, said Ramaphosa. He further warned residents that the likelihood of load shedding would continue as Eskom continues to battle constraints.

“It has severely set back our efforts to rebuild the economy and to create jobs. Every time it occurs, it disrupts people’s lives, causing frustration, inconvenience, hardship,” said Ramaphosa. “At its core, load shedding is the inevitable consequence of Eskom’s inability over many years – due to debt, lack of capacity and state capture – to service its power plants.”

While the steps are welcomed by the provincial government, Winde said he had several concerns surrounding the generation of power.

“The Western Cape has worked hard in recent years to develop the framework to support alternative energy: 23 of our municipalities support Small Scale Embedded Energy, we have promoted the uptake of solar PV, and we have done a large part of the groundwork required for the importation of Liquefied Natural Gas. As a province, we are primed to take advantage of the excellent economic opportunities that green- and alternative energy present for investment and growth,” said Winde.

“We are fortunate, especially in the Western Cape, to have some of the best solar and wind resources in the world, and we have the ability to become the emerging market leader in renewable energy.”

The province has a four-point plan to making this a reality.

. Municipalities will be assisted in procuring energy from Independent Power Producers.

“Procurement in the government space is complicated and time consuming, so we will ensure that there is dedicated support to speed up a more robust procurement process,” says Winde.

. Small Scale Embedded Generation like Solar power across the province will be increased.

. The greening of government buildings across the Western Cape will be increased.

“Where there is a government rooftop that can benefit from solar, it will be installed. We already have solar systems on 17 provincial buildings,” says Winde.

Municipalities across the province are being supported and encouraged to make similar investments.

. Importing of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) through Saldanha Bay will be fast tracked which enables Eskom’s Ankerlig plant to operate on LNG rather than the much more expensive diesel.

“Our work has already de-risked these initiatives, and we call on the national government to move with speed to bring LNG to our industries and power plants in the Province. Gas to power may also make sense in Mossel Bay,” says Winde.

“A petrol company is also already exploring offshore gas there, and while the outcome is several years away, we are starting the work now to make sure that we are able to maximise the major economic advantages which gas provides.”

While wind and solar resources are plentiful in the country, says Winde, adding that there is a potential for six times more generation.

Local departments are already looking at ways to implement this in the province.

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I'll take that over constant schedule changes
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