Art students show their skills through online fair

Zizicelo Sifumba’s artwork titled Duress 2018 (oil on canvas).    Photo: Supplied
Zizicelo Sifumba’s artwork titled Duress 2018 (oil on canvas). Photo: Supplied

The work of three talented art students of the Central University of Technology (CUT), Free State, was selected as part of the top five in the Free State after they participated in the Turbine Art Fair 2020.

They are Xola Brilliant Sello, Zizicelo Sifumba and Sylvester Zanoxolo Mqeku.

The trio’s artworks were showcased through this online art exhibition presented in partnership with the Free State Art Collective from 28 August to 2 September. The theme was “Where Visionaries Meet”.

The purpose of this art fair, among other things, was to showcase how far these students have come in their journeys as artists and to share with the rest of the world what is emerging from little-explored central South Africa.

The event also showcased presentations of digital and new media-based work and highlighted the careers of select mid-career artists.

In addition, it presented visionary new projects, including Tactile Visions, an exhibition of specially curated textile-based artwork from a range of established, mid-career and emerging contemporary artists.

The trio’s participation gave them much-needed exposure.

Sello is doing his Advanced Diploma in Studio Arts at the CUT’s Department of Design and Studio Art.

Born and raised in a creatively driven family in Botshabelo his art making examines the spirit of confidence, economically unresolved issues and the spirit of ubuntu, as to not be critical towards one another.

Sifumba is a master’s student at the CUT and is originally from Sterkspruit in the Eastern Cape.

Her paintings are inspired by intersections of arts practice and community work. Her work is a continuous attempt to depict the experience of South Africa in a metaphoric and non-literal manner.

Mqeku, also a master’s student, was born in Mount Fletcher in the Eastern Cape and grew up in Umtata.

His work is an experiment with negative and positive imprints. Liquid clay is used to capture forms, marks and imprints made in damp plaster sand and often becomes visual warnings and emblems of what nature is imaginable with future natural environments.

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