Vat en Sit comes home to Kby

THE Vat en Sit play is brought home to Kimberley audiences. Photo: Supplied
THE Vat en Sit play is brought home to Kimberley audiences. Photo: Supplied

THE Vat en Sit play is home on stage in Kimberley as part of the 16 Days of Activism Against Women and Children abuse.

The play, written and performed by Kim Maruping and directed by Thabo Motlhabi, is set in Transit Camp in the Galeshewe township of Kimberley, which is notorious as the knife crime capital of South Africa.

Performance of the play started on the 1 December and will run until 11th at the Mayibuye Cultural Centre where locals can get a taste of what the play, that has done very well nationally, is all about. Abuse is one of the main themes of the play, which is reported to have won audiences’ hearts at the Tsoho International Festival (Free State), the Mmabana Mmabatho Mahikeng (North West) and the National Arts Festival 2015 (Eastern Cape).

According to Maruping, this play is unlike any other South African play, which often seems to exaggerate, mock or marvel at conditions in squatter camps and the poverty lifestyle. Vat en Sit is a gripping story of a couple, Moleko and Kebogile, a teenager, who are facing life in the squatter camp and the socio-economic problems that comes with it.

Kebogile is an illegitimate child turned rebellious, and punished for a sin she did not commit. She has had a troubled childhood that led her through rape and more.

In the midst of all of her confusion, she found solace in the arms of a taxi driver, Moleko, who lured her into cohibitation and believes in solving life’s problems with violence.

One night, during one of their regular fights, Kebogile looses herself in the throngs of passion and stabs Moleko 39 times, which results in Moleko not waking up.

This is a simple love story that depicts the realities of possibly many young South Africans today.

Vat en Sit manages to showcase squatter camp life in a way that is realistic. Without adding or taking anything away, it makes life seem normal, like it is for Moleko and Kebogile and some of the audience members,” said Maruping.

Maruping is not superficial in how she addresses abuse. She goes beyond the violence and gives the audience a glimpse into the psyche of both perpetrator and victim.

The play does well in attempting to show the legacy of abuse, in how it creates a vicious cycle of perpetrators and victims who often share deep bonds. Elaborating on the storyline, Maruping says that it is authentic and unpredictable. This certainly makes for very good theatre. Tickets can be booked by inboxing Kim Maruping on Facebook. Adults will pay R50 per person and school kids 12 years old pays R30 each.

Vat en Sit is a gripping story of a couple, Moleko and Kebogile, who are facing life in a squatter camp and the socio-economic problems that comes with it.

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