Baby season creeps up at Crow

AS baby season approaches, there has been an increase in wildlife nesting in the Crow gardens.

One common visitor at this time of the year is the Egyptian goose, whose population numbers have been growing over the years.

Crow’s resources and facilities are being placed under severe strain, to the point that the organisation had no choice but to start a waiting list for non-emergency cases, as they simply ran out of space.

So for those that are happy to have these feathered guests on their property for a few weeks and provided there is no threat from cats or dogs, it is advised one leaves them be. It certainly can be a great experience for young children and an opportunity to teach them about nature.

Of course, in instances where the Egyptian geese are in danger of being attacked by cats or dogs, then relocating them to a safer site may be the better option.
However, given the sheer number of calls for assistance that Crow is currently receiving regarding Egyptian geese, Crow is appealing to the public to work with them in safely catching up families of geese that need to be collected and relocated by their team.

“It is a huge help if the home owner is prepared to lend us a helping hand by getting the family into any enclosed area such as a garage or shed before we arrive. This is relatively easy to do with a washing or laundry basket. Gently scoop up each of the goslings and place them in the basket. Then, with mom and dad watching you, take the goslings and place the basket in your open garage or shed. Soon enough, mom and dad will make their way into the room to be close to their babies. As soon as they’re in, close the door and contact Crow to come and catch them.

“A 10-day-old baby Vervet Monkey, named Mr Bean, was found abandoned and brought to Crow. Sadly, if Vervet Monkeys give birth to twins, one gets left behind. After a couple of days of TLC, Mr Bean has adjusted well and is an active healthy monkey with a bright future ahead of him. Mr Bean receives around-the-clock care from our Primate manager, Mabel Watts, who says Bean is a very content little baby: “Mr Bean now weighs 334g, he drinks 15ml of milk every three hours and ‘sleeps like a baby’ throughout the night.”

“Over the coming months, he will be introduced to some of the other orphaned monkeys in Crow’s care. From there, the young Vervet Monkeys will be integrated into a troop in preparation for their released back into the wild,” Crow.

- Supplied.

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