Stokvel angels paying it forward

PHOTO: PHINDILE SHOZIAngel of God Stokvel Group members Dudu Jeza, Nompumelelo Mthiya, Nge Jeza, Gugulethu Mthiya, Nokuthula Sibisi, and Zodwa Gumede.
PHOTO: PHINDILE SHOZIAngel of God Stokvel Group members Dudu Jeza, Nompumelelo Mthiya, Nge Jeza, Gugulethu Mthiya, Nokuthula Sibisi, and Zodwa Gumede.

STOKVELS differ in a lot of communities; some save money to have a lump sum payment at the end of the year, while others are saving money to buy food in bulk for the festive season.

Founder of the Angel of God Stokvel Group Nompumelelo Mthiya said that she started the stokvel group to help the underprivileged by donating food at the end of the year. “It’s not a non-profit organisation, rather it’s a stokvel group because we meet once a month to discuss things that we might buy with the money we are saving every month,” she explained.

The founder also revealed that they are not only donating to the underprivileged families but they also use the money to buy groceries to have parties for children from different orphanages, just to remind them that they are also loved and cared for.

“Rather than asking for sponsors, we saw it fitting to take money from our own pockets and make the families and children that need help happy at least once a year,” she said.

Mthiya said that each member donates R100 per month to be put into the savings account, which will be used at the end of the year to purchase the food.

“When we started the stokvel, back then it was almost like a bonus from yourself to yourself but, as time went by, it changed,” she explained.

She said the other reason they are doing it is because some of the ladies who are part of the stokvel are not working full-time jobs — they are only called in once a week to come and help. With that small amount of money they are given, they are able to put into their stokvel group and they know that, during the festive season, their families will also have a feast because they are able to buy food with the money from the stokvel.

We live in a world where facts and fiction get blurred
In times of uncertainty you need journalism you can trust. For only R75 per month, you have access to a world of in-depth analyses, investigative journalism, top opinions and a range of features. Journalism strengthens democracy. Invest in the future today.
Subscribe to News24
Lockdown For
DAYS
HRS
MINS
Voting Booth
Is social media doing more harm than good?
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
Yes, our children are exposed and we can't protect them
49% - 6227 votes
Yes, but social media is part of the new reality
45% - 5700 votes
No, it's great for growing a child's world view
5% - 666 votes
Vote
Rand - Dollar
14.13
+0.0%
Rand - Pound
19.86
+0.0%
Rand - Euro
17.07
-0.1%
Rand - Aus dollar
10.92
-0.0%
Rand - Yen
0.13
-0.2%
Gold
1,826.85
+0.6%
Silver
27.09
+0.4%
Palladium
2,863.32
+0.1%
Platinum
1,210.07
-0.3%
Brent Crude
69.32
+1.1%
Top 40
60,211
-2.1%
All Share
66,169
-1.9%
Resource 10
69,474
-3.1%
Industrial 25
82,513
-1.5%
Financial 15
12,499
-1.1%
All JSE data delayed by at least 15 minutes Iress logo