Father fears for son’s life

Bo-Kaap resident Yusuf Ziervogel and his son Hasiem say they are frustrated by health authorities.PHOTO: luvuyo mjekula
Bo-Kaap resident Yusuf Ziervogel and his son Hasiem say they are frustrated by health authorities.PHOTO: luvuyo mjekula

A Bo-Kaap father says health authorities are failing his 44-year-old mentally ill son, constantly placing his life in danger.

Yusuf Ziervogel (74) says his son Hasiem, who suffers from schizophrenia, an illness characterised by symptoms including unclear and confused thinking, is forced to walk to a community centre in Woodstock to collect his medication instead of the new District Six Community Day Centre (CDC) where he gets treated once a month.

This is despite the fact that chronic medicine collection (CDU) is mentioned on the Western Cape Government’s website as one of the services provided by the hospital to 70000 people from Woodstock, Salt River, Vredehoek, Bo-Kaap, City Bowl, and other surrounding areas.

“Why must a mentally ill person walk long distances to collect his medicine? My son has to walk four miles from the hospital (CDC) where he gets treatment, to another facility to get his medicine,” says Ziervogel.

He explains that Hasiem goes to District Six once a month to get an injection and once every six months to see a doctor. However, after receiving attention at the District Six hospital, he has to leave and walk to another facility where he receives his treatment.

Hasiem shares his father’s concerns. He says: “I do not have transport. I have to go to the hospital to get an injection and when I get out of there I am dizzy because of the injection but I have to walk to take my medication.

“It is tiring and there are a lot of cars on the road. People sit there since (04:00). We at Bo-Kaap, why can’t we get our medicine here,” asks Hasiem.

His father says he has reported their concerns to one of the managers at the District Six hospital and she had promised to correct the problem but nothing has changed.

When People’s Post visited the hospital last week, managers were apparently in a meeting discussing problems such as that of the Ziervogels. One senior staffer says since its opening in February this year, the hospital is facing many challenges because it is still new.

The staff member confirms that Hasiem and other patients collect their medication from the St Philips Hall in Chapel Street, Woodstock. She, however, says Hasiem does have a choice between spending hours waiting at the hospital and continuing collecting from Woodstock, where they are no long queues. However, she referred media queries to senior managers.

Health department spokesperson Maret Lesch says: “We are looking into the matter and will revert with feedback.”

A Bo-Kaap father says health authorities are failing his 44-year-old mentally ill son, constantly placing his life in
danger.

Yusuf Ziervogel (74) says his son Hasiem, who suffers from schizophrenia, an illness characterised by symptoms including unclear and confused thinking, is forced to walk to a community centre in Woodstock to collect his medication instead of the new District Six Community Day Centre (CDC) where he gets treated once a month.

This is despite the fact that chronic medicine collection (CDU) is mentioned on the Western Cape Government’s website as one of the services provided by the hospital to 70 000 people from Woodstock, Salt River, City Bowl, and other surrounding areas.

“Why must a mentally ill person walk long distances to collect his medicine? My son has to walk four miles from the hospital (CDC) where he gets treatment, to another facility to get his medicine,” says Ziervogel.

He explains that Hasiem goes to District Six once a month to get an injection and once every six months to see a doctor. However, after receiving attention at the District Six hospital, he has to leave and walk to another facility where he receives his treatment.

Hasiem shares his father’s concerns. He says: “I do not have transport. I have to go to the hospital to get an injection and when I get out of there I am dizzy because of the injection but I have to walk to take my
medication.

“It is tiring and there are a lot of cars on the road. People sit there since (04:00). We at Bo-Kaap, why can’t we get our medicine here,” asks Hasiem.

His father says he has reported their concerns to one of the managers at the District Six hospital and she had promised to correct the problem but nothing has changed.

When People’s Post visited the hospital last week, managers were apparently in a meeting discussing problems such as that of the Ziervogels. One senior staffer says since its opening in February, the hospital is facing many challenges because it is still new.

The staff member confirms that Hasiem and other patients collect their medication from the St Philips Hall in Chapel Street, Woodstock. She, however, says Hasiem does have a choice between spending hours waiting at the hospital and continuing collecting from Woodstock, where they are no long queues. However, she referred media queries to senior managers.

Health department spokesperson Maret Lesch says: “We are looking into the matter and will revert with feedback.”

A Bo-Kaap father says health authorities are failing his 44-year-old mentally ill son, constantly placing his life in
danger.

Yusuf Ziervogel (74) says his son Hasiem, who suffers from schizophrenia, an illness characterised by symptoms including unclear and confused thinking, is forced to walk to a community centre in Woodstock to collect his medication instead of the new District Six Community Day Centre (CDC) where he gets treated once a month.

This is despite the fact that chronic medicine collection (CDU) is mentioned on the Western Cape Government’s website as one of the services provided by the hospital to 70 000 people from Woodstock, Salt River, City Bowl, and other surrounding areas.

“Why must a mentally ill person walk long distances to collect his medicine? My son has to walk four miles from the hospital (CDC) where he gets treatment, to another facility to get his medicine,” says Ziervogel.

He explains that Hasiem goes to District Six once a month to get an injection and once every six months to see a doctor. However, after receiving attention at the District Six hospital, he has to leave and walk to another facility where he receives his treatment.

Hasiem shares his father’s concerns. He says: “I do not have transport. I have to go to the hospital to get an injection and when I get out of there I am dizzy because of the injection but I have to walk to take my
medication.

“It is tiring and there are a lot of cars on the road. People sit there since (04:00). We at Bo-Kaap, why can’t we get our medicine here,” asks Hasiem.

His father says he has reported their concerns to one of the managers at the District Six hospital and she had promised to correct the problem but nothing has changed.

When People’s Post visited the hospital last week, managers were apparently in a meeting discussing problems such as that of the Ziervogels. One senior staffer says since its opening in February, the hospital is facing many challenges because it is still new.

The staff member confirms that Hasiem and other patients collect their medication from the St Philips Hall in Chapel Street, Woodstock. She, however, says Hasiem does have a choice between spending hours waiting at the hospital and continuing collecting from Woodstock, where they are no long queues. However, she referred media queries to senior managers.

Health department spokesperson Maret Lesch says: “We are looking into the matter and will revert with feedback.”

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