New school system planned for 2017 - report

(File, iStock)
(File, iStock)

Johannesburg - The department of basic education hopes a planned new three-tiered school system will eventually see about 60% of pupils completing technical qualifications, the City Press reported on Sunday.

“People can laugh at [EFF leader Julius] Malema because of [his having studied] woodwork, but woodwork can make you a very successful businessman in the furniture business,” Mathanzima Mweli, the director general at the department told the Sunday newspaper.

Malema’s apparent G for woodwork – on a Standard Grade level – was widely reported on, when his public profile rose during his stint as then-ANC Youth League leader.

According to the department’s plan, expected to be implemented in 58 schools in 2017, schooling would be divided into three streams: Academic, technical vocational and technical occupations.

Pupils would be channeled into a particular stream according to their individual strengths and weaknesses.

“As part of the technical occupational stream, we will introduce 26 subjects, which will include spray-painting, panel-beating, hairdressing, woodwork, glasswork, glazing, welding, upholstery, husbandry (farming) and many more,” Mweli explained.

“Almost all successful hair salons in this country are run by outsiders (non-South Africans)”.

The technical vocational stream would focus on gearing students to become artisans and master certain trades:

“Electrical, mechanical and civil engineering will be the core subjects, with each of them having three sub-subjects….

“According to the national development plan, we need to be producing 30 000 artisans every year by 2030.”

Mweli said that the academic stream would be the equivalent of the current matriculation programme.

He labelled the decision, taken in 1994, to shut down technical high schools, or reduce their subjects from 16 to 4 – as a “scandalous mistake”.

“Many things have been tried.  Some of which have taken us backwards.”

Mweli said that the current matriculation qualification did have "currency” and was shown to lead to better employment opportunities.

Nevertheless, he told the newspaper:

“Not every learner has to go to Grade 12 [in the academic stream].  All successful people have not necessarily done Grade 12.”

We live in a world where facts and fiction get blurred
In times of uncertainty you need journalism you can trust. For only R75 per month, you have access to a world of in-depth analyses, investigative journalism, top opinions and a range of features. Journalism strengthens democracy. Invest in the future today.
Subscribe to News24
Lockdown For
DAYS
HRS
MINS
Voting Booth
When assisting your child with remote learning this year, did you:
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
Follow the school's comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) curriculum?
13% - 249 votes
Adjust the CSE curriculum to suit the family's morals?
24% - 455 votes
Ignore the schools CSE programme and do your own teaching?
63% - 1199 votes
Vote
ZAR/USD
15.30
(+0.88)
ZAR/GBP
20.38
(+0.96)
ZAR/EUR
18.30
(+0.64)
ZAR/AUD
11.25
(+0.93)
ZAR/JPY
0.15
(+0.94)
Gold
1805.90
(+1.55)
Silver
23.40
(+3.40)
Platinum
981.00
(+1.65)
Brent Crude
47.66
(-0.77)
Palladium
2386.99
(+1.64)
All Share
57471.71
(+0.67)
Top 40
52741.48
(+0.70)
Financial 15
11248.05
(+0.80)
Industrial 25
79219.53
(+0.32)
Resource 10
53349.24
(+1.23)
All JSE data delayed by at least 15 minutes morningstar logo