Time Travel: Tips for aspiring travel photographers from those in the know

Food, strangers, wildlife, details of nature and the Milky Way. All of these beautiful niches form part of travel. And all are worth capturing. 

Do you want to be better at snapping some of these during your future adventures? Sometimes, it's all in the planning.

Take notes from those photographers in the know: 

The Milky Way

"It always amazes me when going to a remote location like the Kruger National Park, and the stars are much brighter than in the city. Well this is one of the main reasons why photographers go to remote locations to shoot the stars - to avoid light pollution.

"No matter if it’s a cellphone or your DSLR, in order to get Milky Way shots your camera needs to be on a very light-sensitive setting. The less ambient light the more likely it is the light from suns burning lightyears away will be able to reach you." Jay Caboz, journalist and astrophotographer.

READ: Astrophotography tips to capture the Milky Way at its best, from anywhere in South Africa  

Movement 

"I often look for a moment that can never be repeated...I changed my mindset from thinking people made things look like a snapshot to including them as instrumental to giving the images character. When we include movement to a frozen moment, we add personality and an authenticity." Francis Gersbach, videographer and photographer. 

Food

"It's best to do 90% of your editing (framing, styling, light, etc.) before you take the shot. Rather aim for a shot you're happy with than have to fix anything post-production." - Georgia East. Georgia East of @EastAfternoon.

Details of nature

"I step back and capture animals in the environment. Anyone can photograph an elephant, but the story lies in photographing an elephant in its environment." Melanie van Zyl, travel journalist and photographer. 

WATCH: Dereck and Beverly Joubert share 'deep life parallels' in the making of Okavango, River of Dreams 

Strangers

"Photographing people is hard  - much harder than photographing landscapes or architecture or food. My number one piece of advice is to connect with your subject: If possible, chat to the person and get to know them a bit before asking to take a photo. The more comfortable the subject is when that shutter is clicked, the better the resulting image will be. And it's always best to ask first.

"In some countries photographing people without their permission can be considered extremely rude or even illegal, so be sure you know the rules before shooting. While there is also a time and a place for candid portraits (portraits in which the subject is unaware of being photographed), always use good judgement and keep the best interests of your subject in mind." - Heather Mason, travel writer and photographer, 2Summers. 


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