WHO chief reports increase in sexual abuse allegations

accreditation
0:00
play article
Subscribers can listen to this article
Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the WHO. Photo: Getty Images
Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the WHO. Photo: Getty Images
  • The World Health Organisation is currently investigating 12 allegations of sexual abuse and exploitation.
  • Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said the organisation is seeing an increase in reported allegations of sexual abuse, exploitation and harassment.
  • More than 50 countries urged the WHO to take further action to strengthen its approach to such cases.


The head of the World Health Organisation said on Friday that there has been an increase in the number of allegations of sexual abuse, exploitation and harassment (SEAH) within the agency, saying this was a sign that its reform strategy was working.

"We are now seeing an increase in reported allegations of SEAH," Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told a meeting of the WHO's Executive Board.

"This is an indication that the system is beginning to work better and that victims and bystanders are more willing to raise an alarm."

Tedros said that it was currently investigating 12 allegations of sexual abuse and exploitation and 25 allegations of harassment, without giving a comparison.

The new reports follow the start of a reform programme at the UN health agency in the wake of a report by an independent commission last year. It found that 83 aid workers, a quarter of them employed by the WHO, were involved in sexual coercion and abuse during the Democratic Republic of Congo's 10th Ebola epidemic.

In the past two weeks, three new complaints have been received from the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of Congo and neighbouring Republic of Congo, Tedros told the board.

Later on Friday, a group of more than 50 countries urged the WHO to take further action to strengthen its approach to such cases and called for "sustained senior management engagement" on the matter, with regular updates for donors.

Such incidents "deeply undermine the important work being carried out by WHO, and must be addressed both in its work in communities as well as within the organisation itself," said British Ambassador to the WHO Simon Manley.

The US envoy, Bathsheba Nell Crocker, called for "broader organisational reforms" and made specific proposals such as consequences for perpetrators and managers who fail to respond effectively.


We want to hear your views on the news. Subscribe to News24 to be part of the conversation in the comments section of this article.

We live in a world where facts and fiction get blurred
In times of uncertainty you need journalism you can trust. For 14 free days, you can have access to a world of in-depth analyses, investigative journalism, top opinions and a range of features. Journalism strengthens democracy. Invest in the future today. Thereafter you will be billed R75 per month. You can cancel anytime and if you cancel within 14 days you won't be billed. 
Subscribe to News24
Voting Booth
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
Nappies, they cost too much
7% - 301 votes
Formula and food, it's getting so expensive
18% - 802 votes
Creche and school fees are a struggle every month
76% - 3461 votes
Vote
Rand - Dollar
15.85
+1.5%
Rand - Pound
19.83
+0.1%
Rand - Euro
16.77
+0.4%
Rand - Aus dollar
11.18
+0.0%
Rand - Yen
0.12
+1.0%
Gold
1,842.61
+1.4%
Silver
21.85
+2.0%
Palladium
1,994.00
-1.1%
Platinum
961.00
+2.5%
Brent Crude
109.11
-2.6%
Top 40
61,726
-1.2%
All Share
68,246
-1.2%
Resource 10
71,337
-0.6%
Industrial 25
75,802
-1.3%
Financial 15
15,729
-1.9%
All JSE data delayed by at least 15 minutes Iress logo
Editorial feedback and complaints

Contact the public editor with feedback for our journalists, complaints, queries or suggestions about articles on News24.

LEARN MORE