Egypt archaeologists uncover 'complete' Roman city

accreditation
0:00
play article
Subscribers can listen to this article
Mostafa Waziri, the head of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, sitting next to artefacts discovered at an excavation of an 1,800-year-old "complete residential city from the Roman-era."
Mostafa Waziri, the head of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, sitting next to artefacts discovered at an excavation of an 1,800-year-old "complete residential city from the Roman-era."
EGYPTIAN MINISTRY OF ANTIQUITIES / AFP
  • Egyptian archaeologists have discovered a 1 800-year-old city from the Roman-era. 
  • The city is the oldest found on the eastern bank of Luxor. 
  • Archaeologists also discovered pots, tools and coins. 


Egyptian archaeologists said on Tuesday they had discovered a 1 800-year-old "complete residential city from the Roman-era" in the heart of the southern city of Luxor.

The city, dating to the second and third centuries, is the "oldest and most important city found on the eastern bank of Luxor," according to Mostafa Waziri, head of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities.

Archaeologists discovered "a number of residential buildings", as well as "two pigeon towers" - a structure used to house pigeons or doves - and a "number of metal workshops," Waziri said in a statement.

Inside the workshops, researchers found a collection of pots, tools and "bronze and copper Roman coins."

It is a rare archaeological find in Egypt, where excavations - including on Luxor's west bank, where the famous Valley of the Queens and Valley of the Kings lie - are most commonly of temples and tombs.

In April 2021, authorities announced the discovery of a 3 000-year-old "lost golden city" on Luxor's west bank, with the archaeological team calling it "the largest" ancient city ever uncovered in Egypt.

A view of an excavation of an 1 800-year-old
A view of an excavation of an 1 800-year-old "complete residential city from the Roman-era" in the heart of the southern city of Luxor.

Egypt has unveiled several major archaeological discoveries in recent years.

Critics say the flurry of excavations has prioritised finds shown to grab media attention over hard academic research.

But the discoveries have been a key component of Egypt's attempts to revive its vital tourism industry after years of political unrest, as well as after the Covid pandemic.

The government's plans - the crowning jewel of which is the long-delayed inauguration of the Grand Egyptian Museum at the foot of the pyramids in Giza - aim to draw in 30 million tourists a year by 2028, up from 13 million before the pandemic.

The country of 104 million inhabitants is suffering from a severe economic crisis, and Egypt's tourism industry accounts for 10 percent of the GDP and some two million jobs.



We live in a world where facts and fiction get blurred
In times of uncertainty you need journalism you can trust. For 14 free days, you can have access to a world of in-depth analyses, investigative journalism, top opinions and a range of features. Journalism strengthens democracy. Invest in the future today. Thereafter you will be billed R75 per month. You can cancel anytime and if you cancel within 14 days you won't be billed. 
Subscribe to News24
Voting Booth
What are your thoughts on the possibility of having permanent Stage 2 or 3 load shedding?
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
I'll take that over constant schedule changes
13% - 1450 votes
Why are we normalising Eskom’s mess?
72% - 8018 votes
I've already found alternative ways of powering my home/business
15% - 1659 votes
Vote
Rand - Dollar
17.47
-2.2%
Rand - Pound
21.05
+0.1%
Rand - Euro
18.91
-0.2%
Rand - Aus dollar
12.09
+0.1%
Rand - Yen
0.13
+0.1%
Platinum
974.02
0.0%
Palladium
1,623.95
0.0%
Gold
1,865.16
0.0%
Silver
22.35
0.0%
Brent Crude
79.94
-2.8%
Top 40
74,082
+0.6%
All Share
80,241
+0.6%
Resource 10
75,186
+0.7%
Industrial 25
103,461
+0.8%
Financial 15
16,550
0.0%
All JSE data delayed by at least 15 minutes Iress logo
Editorial feedback and complaints

Contact the public editor with feedback for our journalists, complaints, queries or suggestions about articles on News24.

LEARN MORE