Zimbabwe deports DRC refugees who allegedly looted food at refugee camp

accreditation
0:00
play article
Subscribers can listen to this article
Members of the Zimbabwean police service.
Members of the Zimbabwean police service.
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
  • Zimbabwean officials rounded up refugees for deportation after they allegedly looted food rations from the Tongorara Refugee Camp.
  • Zimbabwe deported 70 refugees but the DRC rejected about 15 and they are now in Zimbabwean detention centres.
  • Refugees are resisting Zimbabwe's repatriation process.

The Zimbabwean government deported about 70 refugees back to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in violation of international humanitarian law, the United States Embassy in Harare said.

Officials rounded up 80 refugees who were alleged to have looted food rations from the Tongorara Refugee Camp's warehouse and put them in a Harare prison. Ten were found not guilty and the rest were deported.

"In August (last year) the government removed approximately 80 refugees accused of looting a food supply warehouse from Tongogara Refugee Camp and placed them in detention in Harare.

"The government forcibly returned approximately 70 of these refugees to the DRC in violation of international law, according to an international organisation," the US Embassy said in its recently released 2021 Human Rights Report on Zimbabwe.

READ | With R2 500, we can smuggle you into SA - Zimbabwe traffickers

Established in 1984, the Tongogara Refugee Camp, near Chipinge, has a capacity of 15 000 refugees. Many use it as a transit zone as they escape into South Africa.

The DRC rejected some of the alleged thieving refugees only for them to be returned to Zimbabwe and put in prisons.

"DRC authorities rejected approximately 15 of these, whom the government then placed in detention facilities in Harare," the report stated.

It was also noted in the report that despite a strict "encampment policy" that requires refugees to stay at the camp, some moved into the two major cities, Harare and Bulawayo.

"At year's end, approximately 850 refugees lived in urban areas, including Harare and Bulawayo and more than 6 500 Mozambican asylum seekers lived among host communities along the porous border with Mozambique," the report stated, adding that a substantive number of refugees were in Zimbabwean prisons.

READ | Mugabe-era Zimbabweans who fled to Botswana lose political refugee status after court ruling

Since legally, refugees in Zimbabwe should be in camps, employment opportunities in the outside world are non-existent. As such, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and other partners provide camp residents employment opportunities, including banana farming, livestock production and soap production.

The report noted that many refugees were unwilling to return to their home countries voluntarily. Therefore, resettlement was the only viable solution.

However, Zimbabwe does not allow resettlement for refugees and pushes for their repatriation instead.

"While the government did not accept refugees from foreign countries for resettlement, it facilitated the voluntary repatriation of refugees to their home countries by recognising the Voluntary Repatriation Declaration Form as a valid document for travel purposes," the report stated.

The report also highlighted that there was prolonged detention for undocumented migrants, who are often mistreated by other prisoners.


The News24 Africa Desk is supported by the Hanns Seidel Foundation. The stories produced through the Africa Desk and the opinions and statements that may be contained herein do not reflect those of the Hanns Seidel Foundation.
We live in a world where facts and fiction get blurred
In times of uncertainty you need journalism you can trust. For 14 free days, you can have access to a world of in-depth analyses, investigative journalism, top opinions and a range of features. Journalism strengthens democracy. Invest in the future today. Thereafter you will be billed R75 per month. You can cancel anytime and if you cancel within 14 days you won't be billed. 
Subscribe to News24
Voting Booth
Zama zama crackdown: What are your thoughts on West Village residents taking the law into their own hands?
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
Authorities should bring in the army already
11% - 2612 votes
Illegal miners can't be scapegoated for all crime
51% - 12692 votes
What else did we expect without no proper policing
35% - 8555 votes
Vigilante groups are also part of the problem
3% - 850 votes
Vote
Rand - Dollar
17.01
-0.8%
Rand - Pound
20.11
+0.1%
Rand - Euro
17.08
-0.4%
Rand - Aus dollar
11.69
-0.2%
Rand - Yen
0.12
-0.1%
Gold
1,746.79
-0.7%
Silver
19.06
-2.5%
Palladium
2,128.63
-1.4%
Platinum
898.50
-1.7%
Brent Crude
96.59
+3.0%
Top 40
62,974
-1.9%
All Share
69,719
-1.9%
Resource 10
62,153
-2.8%
Industrial 25
86,103
-0.9%
Financial 15
15,698
-3.2%
All JSE data delayed by at least 15 minutes Iress logo
Editorial feedback and complaints

Contact the public editor with feedback for our journalists, complaints, queries or suggestions about articles on News24.

LEARN MORE