City of Cape Town warns of water supply limitations caused by load shedding

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High-lying or mountainous areas which rely on water-pumping stations are at more immediate risk of low or no water pressure during high stages of load-shedding.
High-lying or mountainous areas which rely on water-pumping stations are at more immediate risk of low or no water pressure during high stages of load-shedding.
  • The City of Cape Town has urged residents to use less water during prolonged stages of load shedding.
  • They say that recent load shedding impacts the water supply in higher-lying areas.
  • Reservoirs cannot fill up fast enough because of the prolonged period of load shedding.

The City of Cape Town has urged residents to use less water during prolonged stages of load shedding to prevent water supply limitations in higher-lying areas.

The City issued the warning following the move to stage six load shedding, which impacts water supply operations in Cape Town, notably in higher-lying areas where water needs to be pumped to get to properties.

"Residents across the city need to help by using less water immediately so we can reduce our collective water use to 850 million litres per day," the City said in a statement.

As a precautionary measure, the City’s Water and Sanitation Directorate urged residents to use less water.

"This will help maintain the supply during prolonged high stages of load shedding, which is affecting water supply operations."

High-lying or mountainous areas which rely on water-pumping stations are at more immediate risk of low or no water pressure during high stages of load-shedding.

Affected areas are:

- Somerset West region

- De Novo and Kraaifontein, including Belmont Park, Eikendal and Scottsville

- the far south region, from Simon's Town to Murdock Valley

- Hout Bay

Acting mayoral committee member for Water and Sanitation Siseko Mbandezi said that the challenge was that reservoirs could not fill up fast enough because of prolonged periods of load shedding.

"Using less water will help deal with operational challenges, notably due to heavy load shedding, which are impacting on our water treatment plants and ability to convey good quality drinking water to reservoirs and areas across Cape Town, especially to high-lying areas where the water has to be pumped [up to]," added Mbandezi.


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