Lockdown: 'Inadequate' nutrition in food parcels may worsen child malnutrition - NGO

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A general view of children and adults at Delft South Primary School standing in line to collect literacy books, sandwiches, oranges and apples on May 21, 2020 in Cape Town, South Africa. (Brenton Geach/Gallo Images)
A general view of children and adults at Delft South Primary School standing in line to collect literacy books, sandwiches, oranges and apples on May 21, 2020 in Cape Town, South Africa. (Brenton Geach/Gallo Images)
  • Child malnutrition may be worsening under the Covid-19 lockdown.
  • The South African Civil Society for Women's, Adolescents' and Children's Health believes food parcels do not cater to the nutritional needs of children.
  • The organisation has called on the government to reconsider how food parcels are distributed, as well as the items contained in them.


Child malnutrition may worsen under the national lockdown, as food parcels fail to cater for child nutrition, a local civil organisation has claimed.

The South African Civil Society for Women's, Adolescents' and Children's Health (Sacsowach) has called on the government to reconsider how they distribute food parcels and the items contained in them.

While child malnutrition has shown an increase over the last decade, it has now been thrown into the spotlight under the lockdown regulations, according to a statement by Sacsowach.

The statement follows comments by Dr Glenda Gray, a member of the Ministerial Advisory Committee (MAC) and chairperson of the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC), in which she said there had been a spike in child malnutrition cases at Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital in early May. Gray later clarified her comment, saying "concerns were raised in the first week of May 2020 regarding the number of admissions for acute malnutrition, which appeared to be on the increase".

In response, Health Minister Zweli Mkhize released a statement saying cases of malnutrition actually declined at the hospital during the months of March and April.

Covid-19 is a threat to health and a major global disrupter; however, hunger has shown itself to be a more tangible threat.
Precious Robinson

Chantell Witten from Sacsowach says: "The intensity and visibility of hunger has been catapulted into the spotlight during Covid-19. Long-winding queues for food parcels will be a feature of the pandemic that will stay with us for years to come. What is not in the eye of the public, however, are the malnutrition rates that underlie child deaths in South Africa."

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Based on the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) – a report compiled by the national Department of Health, Statistics South Africa (Stats SA), the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC), and ICF – stunting rates, an indicator for chronic undernutrition and a lack of food, have child malnutrition increased from 21% in 2008 to 27% in 2016.

27% of children suffer from stunting in South Afri

Severe acute malnutrition remains a significant underlying cause of child mortality. It is still associated with one third of all child in-hospital deaths according to the 2018 interim report from the Committee for the Morbidity and Mortality of Children.

And while food parcels are being distributed to vulnerable communities, many of these fall short in providing for the nutritional needs of children, says Witten.

The organisation is now calling for a co-ordinated approach on all government levels to provide a standardised household food package with adequate nutrition for children and adults, to run alongside mid-upper arm screening of all children under five years old during Covid-19 household screening operations.

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This programme should target the most in need to ensure they are serviced first and will require the direct monitoring and verification of food collection by beneficiaries via a USSD platform that can be mapped with GPS location.

"Covid-19 is a threat to health and a major global disrupter; however, hunger has shown itself to be a more tangible threat. We need to ensure sufficient and sustainable food supplies are made available to vulnerable communities," says Precious Robinson, Chairperson of Sacsowach.

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