Plan 'underway' to access last 10% in Theewaterskloof Dam - Dept

Theewaterskloof. (iStock)
Theewaterskloof. (iStock)

Cape Town – The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) says a plan is being worked on to access the remaining 10% of water still available in the Theewaterskloof Dam.

The Western Cape is suffering from a severe drought, which has threatened to empty the city's water supply.

The department released a statement on Sunday following a media tour of the site at the Theewaterskloof Dam. It also revealed the status of simultaneous operations at the Table Mountain aquifer.

"The Department of Water and Sanitation is currently assisting with drilling into the Table Mountain Group Aquifer as part of the effort to combat the water scarcity in the area," the statement read.

"There is also a plan underway to access the 10% of water still in the Theewaterskloof Dam to increase capacity in the Western Cape Water Supply System."

The remaining 10% in the Theewaterskloof Dam is largely regarded as unusable if used through the current dam system.

The department said the current drought was a cause for concern, and was therefore receiving attention.

The City of Cape Town has marked July 9 as "Day Zero", the day in which it would switch off municipal taps and restrict residents to just 25L a day.

Desired drilling depth of 250 metres

Drilling started on Saturday, February 10, "with the current drilling having intruded various formations of sandstone and shale-like material after which reaching a hard rock formation at 28 metres".

It said the depths of water strikes are at 39 metres and 46 metres.

"A preliminary blow yield was conducted at a depth of 55 metres which yield was measured at 1L per second."

During the media tour this week, the drilling was at a depth of 84 metres. An ultimate desired depth of 250 metres is being looked at, it said.

The department urged residents to practice strict water saving methods and to adhere to the water restrictions imposed in their respective areas, especially the City of Cape Town.

It also urged residents to report any acts that might interfere with the production of water.

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