Ex-cop Derek Chauvin convicted of George Floyd's murder files appeal

accreditation
0:00
play article
Subscribers can listen to this article
  • A former cop convicted of killing George Floyd has decided to appeal his conviction.
  • In his appeal, Derek Chauvin cites at least 14 complaints about his high-profile trial.
  • Chauvin has accused the state of prejudicial misconduct and his issues with the jury selection.


Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has appealed his conviction for the murder of George Floyd, citing 14 complaints about his high-profile trial earlier this year in a case that roiled the United States and laid bare deep racial divisions.

The killing of Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man, in May 2020 went viral after being caught on camera and sparked America's biggest demonstrations for racial justice in decades.

Chauvin, who in June was sentenced to more than 22 years in prison for killing Floyd by kneeling on his neck for nearly 10 minutes, appealed the conviction on Thursday night with a Minnesota district court, on the last day he was able to do so.

These are some of the concerns he listed in the appeal:
  • He accuses the state of prejudicial misconduct
  • Chauvin has listed multiple issues with the jury selected for the trial.
  • He then accuses the court of "abusing its discretion" by denying requests to postpone.
  • He presented with the court for refusing to move the trial and refusing to sequester the jury for its duration.
  • He said he has no income and no legal representation in the appeals process.

A defense fund that paid for his representation during the trial was terminated after his sentencing

Chauvin, a 45-year-old white man, was filmed kneeling on Floyd's neck, indifferent to the dying man's groans and to the pleas of distraught passers-by.

Floyd repeatedly said "I can't breathe" before he died.

The scene, filmed and uploaded by a young woman, quickly spread around the world.

WATCH | 'Burn down racism': global protests spread over George Floyd's death

Hundreds of thousands of people subsequently poured onto streets across the country and overseas to demand an end to racism and police brutality.

The ex-cop and three of his colleagues arrested Floyd on suspicion of having passed a fake $20 bill in a store in Minneapolis, a northern city of around 400 000 people.

They handcuffed him and pinned him to the ground in the street.

Relief at risk

The sacked police officer, who was present for the full six weeks of his trial, did not testify, invoking his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination.

His lawyer said he had followed police procedures in force at the time and that Floyd's death was due to health problems exacerbated by drug use.

But, at the end of the high-profile trial in April, a jury took less than 10 hours to convict Chauvin of Floyd's murder.

He was found guilty on all three charges - second-degree murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter.

The other three police officers are to face state charges next year for their roles in Floyd's death.

READ | George Floyd police reform bill doomed as US Senate talks collapse

Chauvin's conviction was greeted with relief across the country.

Many had feared an acquittal would lead to worse unrest, while others worried that once again a white police officer would get away with what they saw as murder.

The Floyd family's lawyer called the sentencing a "historic" step towards racial reconciliation in the United States.

Chauvin had a record of using excessive force before the unarmed Floyd died under his knee.

At the end of the trial, Chauvin offered his condolences to the Floyd family and said: "There's going to be some other information in the future that would be of interest and I hope things will give you some peace of mind," without elaborating.


We want to hear your views on the news. Subscribe to News24 to be part of the conversation in the comments section of this article.

We live in a world where facts and fiction get blurred
In times of uncertainty you need journalism you can trust. For 14 free days, you can have access to a world of in-depth analyses, investigative journalism, top opinions and a range of features. Journalism strengthens democracy. Invest in the future today. Thereafter you will be billed R75 per month. You can cancel anytime and if you cancel within 14 days you won't be billed. 
Subscribe to News24
Voting Booth
The ANC's leadership race is heating up. Who do you think will be elected party president at Nasrec in December?
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma has got it in the bag
6% - 213 votes
I foresee a second term for Cyril Ramaphosa
81% - 2777 votes
Don’t discount a Zweli Mkhize win
12% - 420 votes
Vote
Rand - Dollar
17.96
-0.7%
Rand - Pound
19.94
-2.6%
Rand - Euro
17.60
-1.3%
Rand - Aus dollar
11.66
-0.2%
Rand - Yen
0.12
-0.4%
Gold
1,659.71
-0.0%
Silver
18.82
-0.4%
Palladium
2,201.50
+2.4%
Platinum
868.00
+0.2%
Brent Crude
89.32
+3.4%
Top 40
56,921
-0.9%
All Share
63,264
-0.9%
Resource 10
59,793
+3.2%
Industrial 25
76,769
-2.3%
Financial 15
13,707
-2.9%
All JSE data delayed by at least 15 minutes Iress logo
Editorial feedback and complaints

Contact the public editor with feedback for our journalists, complaints, queries or suggestions about articles on News24.

LEARN MORE