G7: China must press Russia to stop Ukraine war

accreditation
0:00
play article
Subscribers can listen to this article
Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping meet in Beijing, China on February 4, 2022.
Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping meet in Beijing, China on February 4, 2022.
Getty Images
  • G7 leaders have urged China to press Russia to pull forces out of Ukraine.
  • The leaders also took aim at coercive Chinese non-market policies that distorted the global economy.
  • The Group of Seven rich industrial democracies said there is no legal basis for China's expansive maritime claims in the South China Sea.


G7 leaders urged China on Tuesday to use its influence with Russia to stop its invasion of Ukraine and drop "expansive maritime claims" in the South China Sea, in unprecedentedly tough criticism of Beijing's policies and human rights record.

They called on China to press Russia to pull forces out of Ukraine immediately and unconditionally, citing a ruling by the International Court of Justice that Moscow suspend its military operation, and related UN General Assembly resolutions.

In a communique concluding their three-day summit in the Bavarian Alps, the Group of Seven rich industrial democracies took aim at what they called coercive Chinese non-market policies that distorted the global economy.

The Chinese section of the communique, highlighted by the United States, referred to China's "non-transparent and market-distorting interventions" and other forms of economic and industrial directives.

The G7 leaders committed to work together to ensure a level playing field for their businesses and workers.

The communique further voiced serious disquiet about the situation in the East and South China seas and unilateral attempts to change the status quo by force or coercion.

"We stress that there is no legal basis for China's expansive maritime claims in the South China Sea," it said.

It also said the G7 was now "gravely concerned" - a term not used in their summit a year ago - about the human rights situation in China, including forced labour in Tibet and Xinjiang. China should also honour its commitments to uphold rights, freedom and a high degree of autonomy in Hong Kong, they said.

A NATO summit starting immediately after the G7 summit will tackle China's deepening ties with Russia since Moscow's invasion of Ukraine and what is seen as Beijing's growing inclination of China to flex geopolitical muscle abroad.


Never miss a story. Choose from our range of newsletters to get the news you want delivered straight to your inbox.

We live in a world where facts and fiction get blurred
In times of uncertainty you need journalism you can trust. For 14 free days, you can have access to a world of in-depth analyses, investigative journalism, top opinions and a range of features. Journalism strengthens democracy. Invest in the future today. Thereafter you will be billed R75 per month. You can cancel anytime and if you cancel within 14 days you won't be billed. 
Subscribe to News24
Voting Booth
Zama zama crackdown: What are your thoughts on West Village residents taking the law into their own hands?
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
Authorities should bring in the army already
10% - 1602 votes
Illegal miners can't be scapegoated for all crime
53% - 8579 votes
What else did we expect without no proper policing
34% - 5443 votes
Vigilante groups are also part of the problem
3% - 517 votes
Vote
Rand - Dollar
16.17
+0.5%
Rand - Pound
19.63
+0.2%
Rand - Euro
16.59
+0.2%
Rand - Aus dollar
11.52
+0.2%
Rand - Yen
0.12
+0.2%
Gold
1,802.29
0.0%
Silver
20.82
0.0%
Palladium
2,227.50
0.0%
Platinum
966.00
0.0%
Brent Crude
98.15
-1.5%
Top 40
63,996
-1.0%
All Share
70,731
-0.8%
Resource 10
64,048
-2.8%
Industrial 25
86,577
-0.6%
Financial 15
16,059
+0.6%
All JSE data delayed by at least 15 minutes Iress logo
Editorial feedback and complaints

Contact the public editor with feedback for our journalists, complaints, queries or suggestions about articles on News24.

LEARN MORE