Hopes fade for Qatar residents to perform hajj

Muslim pilgrims touch the Kaaba stone, the cubic building at the Grand Mosque, ahead of the annual hajj pilgrimage. (Khalil Hamra, AP)
Muslim pilgrims touch the Kaaba stone, the cubic building at the Grand Mosque, ahead of the annual hajj pilgrimage. (Khalil Hamra, AP)

Doha - For the last 35 years, Mohammed Shafiq, a Qatari resident from Pakistan, has been working hard to finance his once-in-a-lifetime trip to Mecca.

But his dream of performing the hajj this year is fading fast.

In June, Saudi Arabia, which oversees and manages Islam's two holiest sites in Mecca and Medina, along with the United Arab Emirates, Egypt and Bahrain, severed diplomatic ties with Qatar.

The quartet withdrew their ambassadors in protest at Doha's alleged "interference in their internal affairs" and its support of "terrorism". Qatar denies the allegations.

They also imposed a land, sea and air blockade, making the task of procuring Hajj and Umrah visas nearly impossible.

"I want to go on hajj, but I am not allowed," Shafiq told Al Jazeera.

"The Saudi embassy is closed so how am I supposed to go? ... I am an old man [this could be my last chance] and maybe I will die tomorrow."

With only hours left before the start of the pilgrimage, Shafiq says his only other option is to travel through Pakistan.

But for someone who has lived in Qatar's capital, Doha, for so long, he thinks it is unfair he should to pay to travel so far to a country so close.

Hajj is a pilgrimage to Mecca that Muslims worldwide are expected to make at least once in their lifetime, if they are able to. More than two million people from around the world have converged this year for the pilgrimage.

Last month, Saudi Arabia said Qataris wanting to perform this year's hajj would be allowed to enter the kingdom, but imposed certain restrictions including that those arriving by plane must use airlines in agreement with Riyadh.

They failed to clarify their position on how expatriates could perform the pilgrimage and refused to establish consular services for the duration of the hajj, an offer the kingdom extended to its arch rival Iran.

Qatari authorities subsequently accused Saudi Arabia of politicising hajj and jeopardising the pilgrimage to Mecca by refusing to guarantee their pilgrims' safety.

Qatar's National Human Rights Committee (NHRC) said in a statement "that the hajj cannot be used for political and personal calculations or mediations, rather, it is a right guaranteed by international agreements on human rights and Islamic law".

We live in a world where facts and fiction get blurred
In times of uncertainty you need journalism you can trust. For only R75 per month, you have access to a world of in-depth analyses, investigative journalism, top opinions and a range of features. Journalism strengthens democracy. Invest in the future today.
Subscribe to News24
Lockdown For
DAYS
HRS
MINS
Voting Booth
As a child or as an adult, have you ever been a victim of bullying?
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
Yes, at school
62% - 55 votes
Yes, at work
17% - 15 votes
No, I've never experienced this
21% - 19 votes
Vote
USD/ZAR
14.31
(+0.6)
GBP/ZAR
19.80
(+1.4)
EUR/ZAR
17.14
(+1.1)
AUD/ZAR
11.06
(+0.7)
JPY/ZAR
0.13
(+1.0)
Gold
1,775.02
(+0.7)
Silver
25.95
(+0.4)
Platinum
1,204.76
(+0.7)
Brent Crude
66.94
(+0.5)
Palladium
2,783.31
(+1.4)
All Share
68,699
(+1.3)
Top 40
62,898
(+1.3)
Financial 15
12,446
(+0.8)
Industrial 25
89,364
(+0.8)
Resource 10
70,350
(+2.2)
All JSE data delayed by at least 15 minutes Iress logo