New Zealand suspends extradition treaty with Hong Kong

  • New Zealand suspends its extradition treaty with Hong Kong in protest at a concerning new security law China has imposed on the territory.
  • Foreign Minister Winston Peters said New Zealand was also tightening restriction on military and dual-use exports to Hong Kong.
  • New Zealand's partners in the so-called "Five Eyes" intelligence alliance have taken similar action.


New Zealand suspended its extradition treaty with Hong Kong on Tuesday in protest at a "deeply concerning" new security law China has imposed on the territory, joining its allies in sanctioning Beijing over the move.

Foreign Minister Winston Peters said the suspension, which risks the ire of Wellington's largest trading partner, was because "New Zealand can no longer trust that Hong Kong's criminal justice system is sufficiently independent from China".

He said New Zealand was also tightening restriction on military and dual-use exports to Hong Kong, as well as upgrading travel warnings to Kiwi citizens in the territory.

"China's passage of its new national security legislation has eroded rule-of-law principles, undermined the 'one country, two systems' framework that underpins Hong Kong's unique status, and gone against commitments China made to the international community," Peters said.

New Zealand's partners in the so-called "Five Eyes" intelligence alliance have taken similar action - Canada, Britain and Australia have suspended extradition treaties and the United States has signalled it is preparing to do the same.

There was no immediate response from the Chinese embassy in Wellington, but it warned earlier this month that attempts to pressure Beijing on the security law would amount to "gross interference in China's internal affairs".

Critics have said the security law is an erosion of civil liberties and human rights in the financial hub, which has been semi-autonomous from China since its handover from Britain in 1997.

New Zealand's updated travel advice said the security law had led to an increased risk of arrest for activities such as protests, with the possibility of being removed to mainland China to face maximum penalties of life imprisonment.

We live in a world where facts and fiction get blurred
In times of uncertainty you need journalism you can trust. For only R75 per month, you have access to a world of in-depth analyses, investigative journalism, top opinions and a range of features. Journalism strengthens democracy. Invest in the future today.
Subscribe to News24
Lockdown For
DAYS
HRS
MINS
Voting Booth
Until the matric exams are over, my family is:
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
Self-isolating to ensure we don't miss any exams
13% - 213 votes
Following Covid-19 safety protocols, but still going out like normal
53% - 859 votes
Business as usual, we're not worried about the virus
33% - 535 votes
Vote
ZAR/USD
16.23
(+0.67)
ZAR/GBP
21.02
(+0.59)
ZAR/EUR
18.90
(+1.01)
ZAR/AUD
11.40
(+0.88)
ZAR/JPY
0.16
(+0.82)
Gold
1877.90
(+0.05)
Silver
23.62
(+0.11)
Platinum
844.50
(+0.39)
Brent Crude
37.86
(-0.84)
Palladium
2204.58
(+0.60)
All Share
51684.70
(-0.41)
Top 40
47472.92
(-0.22)
Financial 15
9459.76
(-3.04)
Industrial 25
73439.58
(+1.04)
Resource 10
47245.91
(-1.21)
All JSE data delayed by at least 15 minutes morningstar logo