Chemical castration now a punishment for convicted sex offenders in the US

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"According to the law, if a given offender chooses to stop receiving the treatment, they will be in violation of parole and forced to return to custody."
"According to the law, if a given offender chooses to stop receiving the treatment, they will be in violation of parole and forced to return to custody."

For more than 10 years, US lawmaker and politician Steve Hurst has lead the way on enforcing a bill calling for the chemical castration of sex offenders, a bill that has now been passed into law in Alabama, USA.  

The bill, referred to as HB 379, is aimed at convicted child molesters whose victims were younger than 13, and today (11 June 2019) Kay Ivey, the Governor of Alabama, has signed the bill into law, reports WIVB.com

Administered by way of injection, chemical castration prohibits the production of testosterone, reducing the libido. 

Under the new legislation, sex offenders will begin the chemical castration process before leaving prison and must continue the treatment as part of conditions of parole. The new law stipulates that convicts must cover the costs of receiving the medication. 


Also see: Everything you need to know about child abuse

One in three South African children have been victims of sexual abuse, should South Africa consider implementing a similar law? Share your opinion with us, and we could publish your comment. Anonymous contributions are welcome.


"According to the law, if a given offender chooses to stop receiving the treatment, they will be in violation of parole and forced to return to custody," reports Fox news

"I had people call me in the past when I introduced it and said don't you think this is inhumane? I asked them what's more inhumane than when you take a little infant child, and you sexually molest that infant child when the child cannot defend themselves or get away... If you want to talk about inhumane--that's inhumane," Hurst has said in response to those who deem the punishment a violation of human rights. 

The bill will be implemented in Alabama later this year, and for the politician, the punishment should reduce the number of child molestation incidents in his state. 

"If we do something of this nature it would deter something like this happening again in Alabama and maybe reduce the numbers."

In South Africa, cases of child abuse are alarming, with a national study finding that "one in three children have experienced some form of sexual abuse."

In light of these shocking statistics, perhaps South African lawmakers should consider implementing a similar law.

 Share your opinion with us, and we could publish your comment. Anonymous contributions are welcome.

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