Six ways diet affects your chances of developing breast cancer

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GalloImages/Getty Images
GalloImages/Getty Images

With an interest in breast, thyroid, parathyroid health as well as soft tissue surgical oncology, Dr Justus Apffelstaedt explains that something as simple as diet can be key to diagnosis of breast cancer.

He says it’s thought that diet is partly responsible for approximately 30% to 40% of all cancers. However, diet alone is not likely to prevent cancer as there are other elements involved, such as genetics and environmental factors. A healthy diet, alongside physical exercise, could potentially decrease the possibility of developing breast cancer.

Here are six ways food could play a role in affecting your chances of developing breast cancer:

 

·   According to research, certain vegetables, such as cabbage, turnips, broccoli and cauliflower, have been linked to lowering the risk of breast cancer. Studies have found that women who ate a greater amount of these vegetables were slightly more protected against the disease.

 

·      Although it’s recommended not to overindulge in walnuts as they are high in fat content, a 2011 study found that these nuts might slow down the development and growth of breast cancer tumours. Alternative anti-inflammatory options like papaya, turmeric, blueberries and broccoli could be just as affective.

 

·      It’s recommended that women cut back their consumption of red and processed meat as it leads to a higher risk of breast cancer.

 

·      An intake of vitamin E among postmenopausal women results in a lower risk of breast cancer. Vitamin E is found in plant foods such as seeds and grains, as well as beans and soy.

 

·      Fibre also plays a role in decreasing the risk of breast cancer.

 

·      Other studies have suggested that people with a higher level of vitamin D in their bodies may be less prone to developing certain types of cancer.

    

Unfortunately, we cannot prevent certain aspects of who we are as human beings, including ageing, menopause and family genetic history. However, a healthy diet that consists of foods rich in vitamins and minerals can assist in lowering the risk of developing breast cancer.

 

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