WATCH | F1 drivers on what the sport means to them

Lewis Hamilton and Valtteri Bottas talk in the Drivers Press Conference during previews ahead of the F1 70th Anniversary Grand Prix. (Photo by Mark Sutton/Pool via Getty Images)
Lewis Hamilton and Valtteri Bottas talk in the Drivers Press Conference during previews ahead of the F1 70th Anniversary Grand Prix. (Photo by Mark Sutton/Pool via Getty Images)

• The fifth race of the 2020 Formula 1 season takes place at Silverstone 

• The 70th Anniversary Grand Prix celebrates British Grand Prix 

• Ahead of the race the drivers were asked what the sport means to them 

Ahead of this weekend's 70th Anniversary British Grand Prix at Silverstone, the drivers were asked what the sport means to them and to also recount some of their first memories. 

Six-time drivers' champion Lewis Hamilton said Formula 1 "is my life", and a "platform to use my voice". The 35-year-old Mercedes driver, the only black driver on the grid, has been a vocal supporter of the Black Lives Matter movement. 

In support of anti-racist protesters the Briton has taken a knee at the start of every race this season and wears a sweater emblazoned with Black Lives Matter on it. The rest of the drivers sweaters have the words End Racism. 

Renault driver Daniel Ricciardo jokingly said F1 is a "job".

Daniil Kvyat's first experience of Formula 1 was watching Michael Schumacher compete in the 2004 Australian Grand Prix. The Russian caught the footage while he was catching a plane. Ever since then he watched the sport every race weekend. 

For Carlos Sainz the paddock is part of his family and he has met many people over the years. The Spanish driver heads to Maranello next season to replace Sebastian Vettel. 

"It's my life. It's what I always wanted to do and be part of. I always wanted to be a racing driver," says Red Bull's Max Verstappen. 

"The team work and to see so many people work towards the same goal in one team is always very satisfying," Ferrari's Charles Leclerc told F1.com. 

I recall watching Michael Schumacher battle against Mika Hakkinen in the early 2000s and then a young Fernando Alonso romp to two drivers' titles in 2004 and 2005. 

What does Formula 1 mean to you? Let us know via mail. 

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