WATCH | This is why Formula 1 cars spark

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Sparks fly behind Daniel Ricciardo of Australia driving the (3) Aston Martin Red Bull Racing RB14 TAG Heuer on track during final practice for the United States Formula One Grand Prix.
Sparks fly behind Daniel Ricciardo of Australia driving the (3) Aston Martin Red Bull Racing RB14 TAG Heuer on track during final practice for the United States Formula One Grand Prix.
Clive Mason

There are still a couple of weeks to go until the start of the 2020 Formula 1 season. In the meanwhile, we'll provide you with a daily dose of the sport. 

The team atWTF1 has produced a video explaining why sparks form below F1 cars when they're traveling at 320km/h. The answer might seem simple because they're low and hit the ground, but there's more to it than that. 

There are differences between the sparks that spewed off the floor of the car in the 1980s and the sparks now. 

While we've got you here, let us know which F1 team you're backing in the 2020 season. 

Check out the clip below:

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