SEE: Speedsters beware - here's how South African speeding fines compare to the rest of the world

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<i>Image: iStock</i>
<i>Image: iStock</i>

Fines for South African motorists who are caught speeding have never been higher but how do they compare to the rest of the world? 

GoCompare  has researched 31 OECD member countries (including South Africa) and ranked their varying costs of driving fines (with no added surcharges) based on speeding 21km/h over the limit.

According to GoCompare, South African speedsters often fork out R1 000 or more for speeding offences. Based on its data, Poland is the cheapest country while Germany the most expensive for speeding fines.

Speeding, using a cellphone while driving... which poor road behaviour should be curbed in SA?

Speeding is a major contributor to SA's horrendous road death toll. The speed limit for taxis and buses is 100km/h, for trucks above 350kg it's 80km/h while for other motor vehicles it's 120km/h.

In South Africa, if you are travelling 40km/h or more in a 120km/h zone (i.e 160km/h) you could be arrested.

For a speeding fine, depending on your speed and the area (i.e province and/or city) you could pay up to R1 000 but what about the rest of the world? 


What was the value of your last speeding fine? Do you believe the fine to be fair? What do you think of the speedsters in SA? Email us


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