‘They might deport us’, say foreign nationals as they stay away from vaccination sites

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Many foreign nationals living in KwaZulu-Natal would rather take their chances with Covid-19 than get vaccinated, for fear of being deported.
Many foreign nationals living in KwaZulu-Natal would rather take their chances with Covid-19 than get vaccinated, for fear of being deported.

Many foreign nationals living in KwaZulu-Natal would rather take their chances with Covid-19 than get vaccinated, for fear of being deported.

Others say their reasons for not getting vaccinated include fears that the vaccine will make them infertile or alter their genetics. Some cite religious reasons and others believe that there is no such thing as Covid-19.

Foreign nationals over the age of 18 living in the country are now eligible for vaccination as long as they have some form of identification. This includes a passport or identity book from any country, refugee or asylum-seeker papers or a birth certificate.

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