Sam Smith's new magical album explores love, heartbreak and queerness

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The release of Sam Smith’s latest album marks a new chapter as the musician looks forward to falling in love again and being more positive about life (Photo: Getty Images/Gallo Images)
The release of Sam Smith’s latest album marks a new chapter as the musician looks forward to falling in love again and being more positive about life (Photo: Getty Images/Gallo Images)

The 28-year-old Brit spent the past two years creating songs for a new record, Love Goes, which they say they’re “extremely happy and overjoyed” to release. 

“This album marks the most experimental time of my life, both personally and musically. I wrote this from the age of 26 to 28 and it’s been one hell of a ride,” says Sam, who came out as non-binary last year and prefers to use they/them pronouns. 

“Every time I went into the studio, I promised myself I would shoot for the stars and have no limitations. No guilt, no shame, just the love of singing and creating. The result has been so magical and so therapeutic and fun.” 

Diamonds and more The album contains Sam’s chart-topping hits Diamonds, Dancing with a Stranger with Normani, I’m Ready with Demi Lovato and Promises with Calvin  

Harris. The muso also teams up with Nigerian songwriter, singer and rapper Burna Boy on the track My Oasis, where they sing about needing someone who doesn’t need them back.  

“I’ve been a fan of Burna Boy for years now and am so happy to have a tune with him,” Sam says.  

For the title track, the piano ballad Love Goes, they’ve roped in British rapper Labrinth. 

In a happy space While many of the songs are about pining for love, Sam, who’s currently single, says, “I still believe in it, that love is the answer.” 

But they admit they suffer from many insecurities and finding fame “wreaked havoc on those insecurities”.

“It’s taken a good four, five years to get into a place where I just feel positive about stuff, about life,” Sam said in a recent interview.

“I have OCD [obsessive-compulsive disorder] so it’s not necessarily depression, it’s an anxiety disorder. So just like everyone who’s in their late 20s I feel like I’m just trying to figure myself out so I can lead a happier life because my early 20s were really tumultuous.” 

SOURCES: METRO.CO.UK, NPR.ORG 

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