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YOUNG YOU | New Year's traditions

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Spectacular fireworks light up the sky on New Year’s Eve in Sydney Harbour, Australia.  (Photo: Getty Images/Gallo Images)
Spectacular fireworks light up the sky on New Year’s Eve in Sydney Harbour, Australia. (Photo: Getty Images/Gallo Images)

Civilisations all over the world have celebrated the start of a new year for thousands of years. In modern times, most New Year’s parties start on the last day of the year, 31?December, which is New Year’s Eve, and carry on until the early hours of the first day of the next year, 1?January, which is New Year’s Day.  

Most traditions include parties, feasts and fireworks displays. People also make New Year’s resolutions. Let’s take a look.  

The earliest reference to celebrating the new year comes from 4 000 years ago in Babylonia (modern-day Iraq). The Babylonians celebrated the new year at the first new moon after the spring equinox – in the Northern Hemisphere it’s in late March – when the length of day and night is equal.  

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