Kate’s photo exhibition continues to uplift the nation

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Prince William and Kate Middleton admire a photo in London last week as part of her Hold Still lockdown photography campaign (Photo: Gallo Images/Getty Images)
Prince William and Kate Middleton admire a photo in London last week as part of her Hold Still lockdown photography campaign (Photo: Gallo Images/Getty Images)

It received tens of thousands of entries when the UK was in the grips of the first lockdown – and thanks to Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, it’s still bringing a little light into people’s lives in dark times.

As the UK grapples with a second wave of coronavirus infections and faces a bleak festive season, the duchess’ Hold Still community exhibition continues to be rolled out across the country in towns and cities.

The exhibition features photos from the finalists of the competition, which highlights people’s experiences of life during lockdown.

Sharing a number of the images from the project on her and husband Prince William’s official Instagram account, Kate wrote, “With your help, we’re going to continue to highlight people’s experience of life during lockdown.

“If you see a Hold Still billboard, poster or digital screen – take a photo, tag us and share with #HoldStill2020 – and we’ll feature some of our favourites at the end of the week!”

The photography project was launched in May in collaboration with Britain’s National Portrait Gallery, of which Kate is a patron, and aimed to capture “the spirit of the nation” during the coronavirus pandemic.

It proved to be a huge success, receiving more than 30 000 submissions that focused on three core themes – helpers and heroes, your new normal and acts of kindness.

(Photo: Gallo Images/Getty Images)
Kate and Prince William at a ceremony in London welcoming the 100 finalists of her Hold Still lockdown photography campaign (Photo: Gallo Images/Getty Images)

In a video call recently with her fellow judges, the duchess said she was overwhelmed by the response. “The quality of the images has been extraordinary, and the poignancy and the stories behind the images have been equally as moving as well.”Joining her on the judging panel were England’s chief nursing officer, Ruth May; director of the National Portrait Gallery, Nicholas Cullinan; writer and poet Lemn Sissay; and photographer Maryam Wahid.

Sources: dailymail.co.uk, independent.co.uk, Instagram

 

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