THE BIG READ: Why I took on Andrew Wakefield, the man who made millions of parents fear vaccines

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Andrew Wakefield arrives at court in London with his wife, Carmel, in 2007. The physician was later struck off the medical register after it was found he’d misled parents into believing that vaccines cause autism. (Photo: Getty Images/Gallo Images)
Andrew Wakefield arrives at court in London with his wife, Carmel, in 2007. The physician was later struck off the medical register after it was found he’d misled parents into believing that vaccines cause autism. (Photo: Getty Images/Gallo Images)

For three years I’d been investigating Andrew Wakefield, determined to show that the British medical researcher who’d made millions of parents nervous about giving their children vaccines, because of his claims that they caused autism, was in fact a fraud.

Then one day in 2006, Wendy Stephen stepped into my life. She introduced herself in a 600-word email as the mother of a vaccine-injured child.

Wendy told me that in 1991, her baby daughter had received the three-in-one MMR jab against measles, mumps and rubella and lost all hearing in one ear. This was a rare and recognised side-effect of two brands of MMR that were discontinued in Britain the year after Wendy’s daughter got her shot.

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